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CONTENTS

Test assessment package

4

TEST 1         MODULE 1

Use of English • Listening • Speaking

8

TEST 2         MODULE 2

Use of English • Reading • Writing

TESTA          MODULES 1 &2

Use of English • Writing • Reading

Listening • Speaking

10

TEST 3         MODULE 3

Use of English • Listening • Speaking

17

TEST 4         MODULE 4

Use of English • Reading • Writing

19

TESTB          MODULES 3 &4

Use of English • Writing • Reading

Listening • Speaking

22

TEST 5          MODULES

Use of English • Listening • Speaking

27

TEST 6        MODULE 6

Use of English • Reading • Writing

29

TESTC          MODULES 5 &6

Use of English • Writing • Reading

Listening • Speaking

32

TEST 7         MODULE 7

Use of English * Listening • Speaking

36

TEST 8         MODULE 8

Use of English • Reading • Writing

38

TEST D        MODULES 7 & 8

Use of English • Writing • Reading

Listening • Speaking

41

TEST 9         MODULE 9

Use of English • Listening • Speaking

45

TEST 10       MODULE 10

47

Use of English • Reading • Writing

TEST E         MODULES 9 & 10                 SO

Use of English • Writing • Reading Listening • Speaking

TAPESCR/PTS                                                            55

ANSWER KEY                                           60


TEST 1       Use of English

A Read the text and put the verbs in brackets

in the correct tense.                                  (8 points)

Celine Dion's singing career (0) tf#st?d....... (start) in a similar way to Michael Jackson's. The youngest of fourteen children, she (1) (begin)

performing with her family in the Canadian province of Quebec when she was just twelve years old. By the

age of eighteen, she (2) (produce)

nine albums in her native French, but she was still unknown in the English-speaking world. She (3) (decide) to learn English so she could enter the world of international pop music. Dion does not write her own love songs. She

(4)                               (admire) singers who

(5)                               (write) their own material, but, for

the moment, she is happy to interpret other people's songs. Since she (6) (become) successful, she says, she (7) (receive)

thousands of songs from writers, so she has plenty of songs to choose from.

At the moment she (8) (record) in

French and she wants to introduce her French songs to an English-speaking audience. (Adapted from BBC English)

.By Complete the table with the adjectives formed from the words provided.            (8 points)

importance

LMWortaxt

rely

 

decision

 

mystery

 

logic

 

mood

 

sympathy

 

tolerate

 

like

 

•fez Complete the sentences with one word in

each gap.                                                   (7 points)

0     


If you don't remember her telephone number, you can look it df:. in the yellow pages.

1      I   forward to seeing you in Paris again.

2      Why are you always getting me?

This time it's not my fault.

3      Fasten your seat belts, please. The plane is going to off in a minute.

4      I have never been able to on with my sister. We are just too different.

5      Tom checked        at the Eaton Hotel at

10 a.m. and went out to do some sightseeing.

6      I can't       up with that noise any

more! I'll go and ask them to turn the radio

down.

7      We can get with one room at the

moment, but we'll need a bigger flat when the

baby is born.

D Complete the sentences with appropriate adjectives. Use only one word in each gap. The

first letter of each word is provided.        (7 points)

0                                         They need more money for the preservation of Mfipno buildings and monuments.

1                                         citizens always obey the law.

2                                         person is not very willing to accept changes or new ideas.

3                                         You are already 18 years old, but your

behaviour is so c ! Try to act more mature.

4                                         A s person cares only about himself/herself, and not about other people.

5                                         Mark is highly s   of Ann's

intentions. I guess he doesn't trust her any

more.

6                                         Look how awfully c... they are! It's supposed to be a friendly match, but they look like they are trying to kill each other.

7                                         Try to find some good points about her essay first. She is very $ to criticism.

                                                                                Total           30

"


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TEST 1        Listening

Task 1

A, Listen to an interview about stereotypes with

Adam Dalton. Decide if the statements are true

(T) or false (F).                                                             (5 points)

1      Stereotypes often have historical or

            cultural roots.                                                              T / F

2      Adam presumes that people use

            stereotypes unconsciously.                                      T / F

3      Hearing another accent, Adam never

           judges its speaker.                                                      T / F

4      British people are considered reserved and many are proud of that fact. T / F

5      Advertising agencies rarely use stereotypes

             to promote their products.                                       T / F

TEST 1       Speaking

Task

Work with your partner. Exchange information about your preferences.

Task 2


Listen again and answer the questions.

(5 points)

Does Adam make stereotypes unconsciously? Can Adam cope without stereotyping other people?

Is stereotyping a sign of survival instinct? Does Adam suggest that Brazilians may consider being reserved a negative feature?

Are stereotypes used in advertising?

 

10

Total


Student A

Tell your partner about your preferences concerning the following things:

-    activities to do at the weekend

-    types of books to read

-    food you enjoy eating

-    new people you like meeting

Remember to use colloquial expressions:

I'd rather, wouldn't mind, can't stand, I'd prefer.

I'd love, (just) love, (ready) like/keen on, hate. don't think I'd want, I'm realty into, don't tike

Your partner may ask you questions.

Student B

Tell your partner about your preferences concerning the following things:

-    places to go on holiday

-    films to watch on TV or at the cinema

-    sports to practise/watch on TV

-    communicating with people (sending letters, exchanging emails, talking on the phone)

Remember to use colloquial expressions:

I'd rather, wouldn't mind, can't stand, I'd prefer, I'd love, (just) love, (reaity) like/keen on, hate. don't think I'd want, I'm realty into, don't tike

Your partner may ask you questions.

|

!

!

                                                                                                                                   Total         20

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TEST 2       Use of English

Circle the correct alternative in each

sentence.                                                                       (3 points)

0      She looked worn out as if she had travelled/ had been traveUing)a[[ night.

1      I refused to go out with him when I heard he had asked/had been asking Mary out before me.

2      We had finished/had been finishing the third game of chess when they finally came.

3      Tears were streaming down his face because he had cut/had been cutting onions.

4      I didn't have to water the flowers in the garden as it had rained/had been raining all morning.

5      After our teacher had explained/had been explaining the problem, he went on to give us the homework assignment.

6      Ann passed her exam with flying colours because she had studied/had been studying very

hard for two weeks.

•&; Put the verbs in brackets into the Past

Simple, the Past Continuous, the Past Perfect or

the Past Perfect Continuous.                                  (8 points)

I (0)         ...femdt.             (find) this story while I

(1) (read) Spotlight the other day: In 1986, a Canadian man (2) (rise) from the sofa where he (3) (fall) asleep, (4) (drive) 14 miles, (5) (kill) his mother-in-law and seriously (6) (injure) his father-in-law. He was charged with murder but acquitted when a court (7) (accept) his lawyer's

argument - and his physician's evidence - that he

(8)                                (sleepwalk).'

(Adapted from Spotlight)

Rewrite the sentences, replacing the underlined parts with the correct idiom formed with one of the words given in the box. (6 points) leg JkumtjS" pie ice

0       Robert has dropped a glass. He is very clumsy.

H&k.<dlf.£kmd?s, '.

1       Don't believe her. She is joking.

2      


I wouldn't do it if I were you. You are in a very dangerous position.

3       I know now that what I did yesterday was awful. I'll have to apologise for everything.

D, Complete the sentences with appropriate words. Use only one word in each gap. The first letter of each word is provided. (9 points)

0      What I said was not really funny, but all the girls started §i§§tiM$

1      In the first words of his speech, the President e his concern about the people made homeless by floods.

Kate b          out laughing when she saw Tom trying to imitate a monkey. I'm sure you'll win easily. I am a bit o     of practice.

The food must have been rotten. Robert took

several bites, t pale and rushed to the bathroom.

The steps were so slippery that I had to c to the handrail.

you the joke about the

frog going on holiday?

A little girl fell from a bridge into deep water below, but fortunately she didn't d

3 When my grandmother was sixty, she felt much too young to be put out to g

She wanted to carry on working.

9 Tom's voice started to t wanted to cry.

>|v Match the multi-part verbs with their

definitions.                                               (4 points)

0      give up \    a) to invent

1      crack up \ b) to claim or pretend

2      turn off \   c) to stop paying attention or taking interest

3      make up \ d> to choose, enjoy something 4 go off to adopt, e.g. a different

                                         6)

                                   \          voice or accent

5      dress up    'f)         to stop doing something

6      make out   g) to wear someone else's

clothes

7      put on       h) to stop liking something

8      go in for    i)          to break out into laughter

                                                                               Total             30


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TEST 2       Reading

Why don't we all laugh at the same things?

Experts say that several obvious differences in people affect what they find humorous. The most significant . seems to be age.

Infants and children are constantly discovering the world around them. A lot of what goes on seems ridiculous and surprising, which strikes them as

funny. Whafs funny to a toddler consists of short and simple concepts. Along with the ridiculous and the surprising, children - much to their parents' disappointment - also appreciate jokes where cruelty is present and what we refer to as 'toilet humour'. Psychologists claim that to children, dealing with bodily functions is simply another way of exploring their fascinating new environment.

The pre-teen and teenage years are, aLmost universally, tense and rebellious. Lots of adolescents and teens laugh at jokes that focus on sex, food, authority figures etc. It is a time of life when you lack confidence, so young people often use humour as a tool to protect themselves or to feel superior.

As we mature, both our physical bodies and our attitudes towards life and the world grow and change. Since there is a certain amount of

intelligence involved in 'getting' a joke, our sense of humour becomes more developed as we learn more. By the time we have matured, we have experienced much of life, including tragedy and success. In keeping with these experiences, our sense of humour

is more sophisticated. We laugh at other people and ourselves in shared common embarrassments. The adult sense of humour is usually characterised as more subtle, more tolerant and less judgmental about

the differences in people. The things we find funny as a result of our age or developmental stage seem to be related to the stressful experiences we go through during this time. Basically, we laugh at the issues that stress us out.

Another factor that affects what we find funny is the culture or community from which we come. Have you ever laughed at a joke and realised that if you were from anywhere else in the world, it just wouldn't be funny? It is a fact of life that culture and community provide lots of stories for jokes. There are economic, political and social issues that are easy to laugh about, but only the people living

in that culture may understand it. For example, a joke from a small country might not have universal


appeal because it would be so little understood. The

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big, influential, much-observed United States might be the exception to this rule. Thanks to media and movies, most people around the world know what is

going on here. So jokes about a situation in the United States can be enjoyed pretty much across the globe.

When people say 'that's not funny,' the theorist Veatch says they mean either 'It's offensive' or 'So, whafs the point?' For someone to find a joke or situation offensive, they must be somewhat attached

to the principle or person being ridiculed or put down in the joke. So racist and sexist jokes are offensive to many people who feel strongly about

fighting prejudice in the world. According to Veatch, when someone says, 'So, whafs the point?' it indicates the presence of a moral or emotional

attachment or commitment to the joke's 'victim'.

Task 1

Read the text and decide which is the correct

      answer, a), b) or c).                                                   (5 points)

1      What do children not find amusing?

a)    jokes of cruelty

b)    toilet humour

c)    jokes on authority figures

2      Why is the adult sense of humour more subtle?

a)    because of life experience

b)    because of intelligence

c)    because of physical growth

3      What do adults most often Laugh at?

a)    tragedy and success

b)    differences in people

c)    stressful things

4      Where are cultural jokes best understood?

a)    in the United States

b)    in the community from which that joke

comes

c)    in small countries

5      According to theorist Veatch, when may people find a joke offensive?

a)    when it deals with racist issues

b)    when they identify with the one who suffers in the joke

c)    when they are prejudiced against the

joke-teller

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Task 2

Read again and decide if the statements are true

(T) or false (F).                                         (5 points)

1      Age does not have any influence on our

          sense of humour.                                      T/ F

2      Parents do not approve of jokes containing

           cruelty.                                                     T/ F

3      Young people use teenage humour as a form of protection against the feeling of

          insecurity.                                                 T / F

4      Culture-oriented jokes do not provide

           opportunities to laugh.                               T / F

5      Media can help people understand jokes

all across the world.                       T / F TotaL           10

TEST 2     Writing

Task


Describe one of the following. Your work may consist of 200-250 words. Do not exceed the word limit

A        The party I will never forget

B        The worst exam in my life

C        The holiday abroad that I will remember for ever

In four or five paragraphs write about:

the main events the people involved

actions taken your reactions

your decisions

the final outcome

Useful expressions: suddenly, following, then, when, alt of a sudden, . • • in the end, before, at last, until, after, as soon as, immediately, eventually

                                                    •                                                                                                                                             20

,i

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TEST A       Use of English

'jflk.,' Read the text and put the verbs in brackets

in the correct tense.                                (12 points)

I (0) met (meet) my future husband over a burnt sausage roll. He (l) ...: (walk) into the university kitchen just as I (2)

(remove) what was meant to be my dinner from the oven. If I (3) (hear) about The Rules about how to 'catch' a man, I would have smiled at him mysteriously and walked out without speaking, leaving him to think: 'Who is that fascinating

creature?' Instead, I (4) (make) a joke

about my bad cooking. Sixteen years on, he

(5) (do) the cooking in our house.

According to The Rules, I (6) (do) it

all wrong. Not the cooking, but the talking. When this guide to finding and marrying 'Mr Right' first

(7) (appear) in the US last year, it (8) (become) an immediate best-seller

by giving women the sort of advice their

grandmothers (9)                        (give) their

mothers. The technique is popularly known as 'playing hard to gef.

      The Rules (10)                     (receive) a lot of

criticism. Feminists complain that it

(11) (tell) women to forget everything they (12) (learn) about equality between the sexes.

(Adapted from Spotlight)

tfy There is a mistake in each line of this

text. Find it and correct it as in the example. Write your answers below. (10 points)

0       After I had been finishing my report, I got

1       boring with everything and left the office

2       early. I knew I was walking on light ice

3       because my boss has already warned me

4       not to do that. It was raining strongly

5       outside so I was taking a taxi to the nearest

6       restaurant. When I got there I had seen my

7       boss waiting unpatiently for the meal. He

8       said something and his friends fell with

9       laughing. Suddenly he noticed me and made

10    red with fury. I had to eat difficult pie the next day in the office,;


C Complete the sentences with the adjectives from the box. There are three more adjectives

than you need.                                          (4 points)

    sympathetic   developing      law-ding'      wealthy

likeable chatty sensible reckless reliable outgoing innovative sensitive

0      The government will take steps to ensure that

..................... citizens are protected.

1      When my dog was run over by a car, my

goods and technology.

5      I try to avoid travelling in a car with Eric. He is such a/an driver.

6      What we need are ideas. Only introducing changes will make our business a

success.

7      Joanna was born into a very and aristocratic family. She has never worried about money.

8      My twin brothers are very different. Andrew is very sociable and , while John

tends to be very shy and likes being on his own.

D Complete the following sentences with the correct multi-part verb formed from one of the

verbs given in the box.                             (9 points)

crack jjwsf get get get go make put ring take

0      They had a plan to             ....dress            up       as

guards and escape from the prison at night.

1      If you continue to ignore your teacher's

remarks, you will trouble very soon.

2      Tom, Jerry and Steven are a very funny trio when they get together. They always me

3      Mary usually gets disappointed with her boyfriends within two weeks. I'm sure she'll Peter very quickly.


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4      If you want me to stay longer, I need to '. my parents. Otherwise they will start to worry.

5      I don't know many fairy tales so I usually

some stories about dragons

or witches for my children.

6      It's impossible to ;. on such a small income.

7      I can't       with her any longer.

She keeps complaining about everything.

8      All passengers are in their seats and we are going to in a while.

9      I'm sure Ann will She is intelligent, hard-working and ambitious.

TEST A      Writing

Task

Write a letter to a pen friend with whom you have just got acquainted in which you describe

your local area. Your work may consist of

120-150 words. Do not exceed the word limit. Include information about the following in your description:

the local people the local attractions

what you like/dislike about living there ways of spending free time (things to do, places to go)

the local cuisine

ways of travelling around the area threats of living there (e.g. street violence) changes in this area over the last few years a short comment on why you would recommend that your pen friend visit your local area

Decide about the style, layout and useful vocabulary to include in your letter.

Use these linking words:


so, because, if, when, after, well, however, although, in addition, anyway, in case, despite, as well as, also, too, so that

Total |~[20l

Match the words from two columns to form meaningful expressions. s. (5 points)

0        listen    a) horror 1        express\            b) laughing

2        sleep         ^          c) on the surface of water

3        burst out   d) a joke

4      splash                    e) heavily

5             tremble             n water all over the place

6             clutch   9) hold of someone's arms

7             emerge h) attentively

8             pull         *) from the bushes

9             float .i) with cold 10 tell k) someone's leg

Total

40

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.


TEST A      Reading

Why do the Irish speak English? By Fiona Grijfen

Language identifies. 'He speaks French so he is French.' But the Irish speak English and are certainly not English. When the Irish writer Samuel Beckett was asked whether he was English, he answered 'on the contrary1. Everyone agrees that the Irish are very unlike the English. How did it come about that the Irish people speak a foreign language? Have they no language of their own?

The first official language of Ireland is Irish, but you could spend your whole lifetime in Ireland and never hear anything but English in everyday

conversation, other than perhaps 'slainte' - the Irish toast. Public figures sometimes include a 'cupla focal' - a few words - of Irish in their speeches. Out of a population of 3.6 million, no more than 4 per cent still speak Irish daily, but Irish is a compulsory subject for school children throughout their school years. What's more they must pass Irish in order to be admitted to the National University of Ireland, or

to work in the civil service and in many other organs of the state. Street names, signposts and n destinations are all bilingual. The vast majority of the population wishes to retain Irish in pride of place. So if they love the language so much, why

don't the Irish speak Irish?

The answers are found in history, which is largely determined by geography. The Romans conquered most of the known world, but though they looked across the sea to Ireland and claimed to be able to conquer it with one battalion, they never did. The Germanic tribes who overran the mainland of Britain and laid the basis for modern English didn't bother to cross the Irish Sea. Norman warlords invaded England, then moved on to Ireland in the twelfth century, but they were eventually assimilated into

Irish culture until they were 'more Irish than the

Irish themselves'

In the sixteenth century, King Henry VIII of England became concerned that Ireland could be used as a 'back door* into England by France or Spain and feared it could be persuaded to collaborate with his enemies. He decided that Ireland should conform


to England in every way and began a systematic conquest, continued by his daughter Elizabeth I and succeeding monarchs. One of their priorities was the elimination of the Irish language. Irish poets were jailed and a great number of manuscripts in Irish were destroyed.

The struggle to survive of 'The Old Gaelic Order* lasted nearly 200 years, but by the end of the eighteenth century it was dead and the English victory was complete. From that time on, all the affairs of the nation were conducted in English and Irish became the language of the poor. The only book published in Irish was the Bible.

Nowadays, the Irish continue to speak English and they learn Irish. There is a famous Irish saying: 'A country without a language is a country without a soul' The Irish have two languages, their own which

they hardly speak and English which is not theirs,

but by keeping the one and creatively using the

other, perhaps they manage to hold onto the soul of Ireland.

(Adapted from The World of English)

Task 1

Read the text and answer the questions. (5 points)

1      How many people in Ireland use the Irish language on a daily basis?

2      When did the Normans invade Ireland?

3      Of what was Henry VIII afraid?

4      How did the English monarchs try to get rid of the Irish language?

5      When did the English eventually defeat the Irish and their Language?

Task 2

Read again and decide if the statements are true (T) or false (F). (5 points)

1      The only common Irish expression one can hear in everyday conversation in

            Ireland is the Irish toast.                             T / F

2      Children do not have to learn Irish at

           school.                                                      T / F

3      The names of streets in Ireland are

           written in two languages.                            T / F

4      Elizabeth I was against the Irish

          conquest.                                                    T/F

5      The Old Gaelic Order" was the title of the only Irish book that survived the

           struggle.                                                    T / F

                                                                                 Total         10


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TEST A        Listening Task 1

Listen to an interview with Dr William Fry and decide which is the correct answer, a), b) or c).

(5 points)

1      Dr Fry is talking about studies on

a)    the effects of laughter associated with humour.

b)    human physiology and stress.

c)     healing methods used in laboratories.

2      Scientists haven't measured the positive effects of laughter on a) adults.

b)    teenagers.

c)     children.

3      Ifs not easy for doctors to use humour at work because

a)    they want to maintain their professional image.

b)    patients may not take them seriously.

c)     they don't think it would have any value.

4      What you can't find among humour facilities are

a)    extra meals in the humour rooms.

b)    clowns and performers.

c)    


special TV channels and programmes.

TEST A      Speaking

Task

5      When you study, laughter helps your brain to

a)    fall asleep faster.

b)    keep alert and active.

c)    fight stress after the exam.

Task 2

Listen again and decide if the statements are

true (T) or false (F).                                  (5 points)

1      Or Fry believes that a laughter associated with happiness involves the whole body. T/F

2      The effects of the healing humour have not been scientifically examined.      T / F

3      It wouldn't be beneficial if humour eliminated stress from our lives. T / F

4      US hospitals provide many humour facilities for their patients. T/F

5      Putting a red nose on while you are stuck in a traffic jam can be a good way of releasing the tension caused by the

          jam.                                                           T / F

                                                                               Total         10


Work with your partner. Describe a funny situation which you have recently experienced. Tell your partner about the following:

what happened when it happened

where it happened

who was there what the people did what was funny about the situation

how the people reacted to it

j -        how it ended what the consequences of this incident were

    ' ™—jm

Remember to use some of these expressions:

and then, guess what, just before, luckily, right, so. eventually, well

Your partner may ask you questions.

                                                                                                                      Total    120

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TEST 3      Use of English

J ^ U s e the expressions from the box to complete the sentences. Some are used more

than once.                                       .          (5 points)

uch so like

*

0      Ifs Xti&fk a long journey that we'll need to stop on the way to rest.

1      Visitors to Washington DC maw admire the monuments to honour pkj^*. great men

. as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and

          Thomas Jefferson,                              L ^ t.

2      She has to earn lots of money $.!Z^Z.. she can afford to study at a private school.

3      The waiter has been .tefe nice to us that we are going to give nim a dollar tip.

4      I have never felt ffi.        lonely in my life.

5      She is interested in Impressionists ...

Degas and Monet.

B Join the sentences using defining and

non defining relative clauses.                      (7 points)

0     My sister got married yesterday. She had been engaged for two years.

..Myjkf^j.^^.h^-k^^.?^M^p^.ti^p.

1     I read a travel brochure.'Hsaid good health was essential for this kind of trip.

2     Lawyers;^erid a lot: of time learning about new developments in their field. They have to know the legal system very well.

3     Kate raised Yhejissue of unemployment. Her father doesn't have a job at the moment.

4     1 noticed a woman./She was scared stiff.

:                                •               '                                                -                                                .                                                My little^sisterdften picks her teeth after a meaf^rma^'dligusting.

7

6      Mark doesn't like that womarrTS«e tried to persuade him to buy a useless gadget.


                           :-'-*l by      ,

7      The hotel'was posh but cosy. Our parents used to stay^there while in Paris.

'rite the words and expressions from the

         ox under correct verbs.                           (6 points)

                              w *i           -t T                        • t

a dreamV to the top- a look& an influence a mess** lost a promotion? a phone call/ an effect'" a poinj in touch^? a mistake'/ make   have t. get ">

/    &      * implete the sentences with one word in

'     each gap.                                                 (6 points)

0      The only way to lose weight is to give a^™             sweets,

1      Ana .Z* . after her mother. She has the same dark hair, blue eyes and big feet.

2      Did that handsome tall man ask you to ....fffQ. out with him?

4$ My grandmother is getting-^5*bfe£*~ and doesn't hear too well any more.

Jf Not many children nowadays £s£n*&rfp*^Z. in for stamp collecting. They prefer sports.

5    My little niece comes     fi£5fifi?. as being very self-confident.      ,*.         .^_        jfo,

~&    Tom     goes     .**&&££ ^fifigStitf®^ regardless of what they look like.

the text below and think of the word

which best fits each space. Use only one word in each gap.    (6 points)

Changing looks has become a great (0) GK&L in my school. You need to come to class with your hair (1) ..fzl^z. Natural colour was verv^/.. ( stylish last year, but now it's (2) .^.^JCflE:..;.... Yo'irf

         ears have to be (3) JAtA*&&-» and long earrings        *    >

are absolutely essential, and that goes for both girLs and boys. As for the nails - only girls have them (4) .i#3tfl/3$g^DOys often get their a r m s ^ - 4 ^ (5)j^s£^tuft.. with flowers or their girlfriend's name. Our parents and teachers complain and can't understand that it's the (6) jAftfCLy style.

                                                                                      Total I   (30

PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                                                           


TEST 3     Listening

Task 1

Listen to a lecture on learning styles and decide if the statements are true (T) or

false (F).                                                    (5 points)

1      Visual learners should sit at the back of the class to have a better view of other

          students and the teacher.                            T / F

2     


Diagrams, illustrated text books and charts are useful learning tools for visual

           learners.                                                    T / F

3      Written information doesn't have much meaning for auditory learners until they

           hear it.                                                      T / F

4      The need for activity and exploration is characteristic of tactile learners. T / F

5      Listening to music or chewing gum are distracting for tactile learners. T / F

Task 2

 

10

Total  

TEST 3      Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

 

Student A

Choose a person you know well (e.g. a member of your family, a friend, a teacher) and describe him/her. Include the following information:

the person's personal information (age, appearance etc.) his/her personality his/her likes/dislikes (sports, food, music,

free-time activities etc.)

his/her lifestyle

his/her most important experience in life his/her ambitions

Use expressions that help introduce the topic, give examples and add information and end the talk.

Your partner may ask you questions.

•-S

Student B

Choose a person you know well (e.g. a member of your family, a friend, a teacher) and describe

him/her. Include the following information:

the person's personal information (age, appearance etc.) good and bad sides of his/her character his/her hobbies and interests his/her abilities and skills his/her daily routines

his/her plans for the future

Use expressions that help introduce the topic, give examples and add information and end the talk.

Your partner may ask you questions.

                                                                                                                                                                                                        Total [     20

                                                                         PHOTOCOPIA&LE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002

Listen again and tick the correct answers in the table.     (5 points)

 

Visual

Auditory

 Kinaesthetic'

1 The pitch and tone of voice may matter in the case of ... learners.

 

 

 

2 Multimedia could be useful for... learners.

 

 

 

3 Active exploration of the physical world is best for... learners.

 

 

 

4 Musical jingles are helpful for... learners.

 

 

 

5 Frequent study breaks should be used by ... learners.

 

 

 


 

TEST 4       Use of English

ij^^Put the verbs in brackets in the Passive Voice

in the correct tense.                                                    (10 points)

0      I hate ....£fitff^.£?&£... (tell) by my parents what to do.

1      Before vjfrifehtfjvthe Royal Castle, they

         iSB^-^S^Ji&k^pf^jDQSh                     restaurant.

2      Ticket pricesii6$i$d'.'.. (keepjQow since

          1995                                                                    f

3      Smoking should public places.

4      101 Dalmatians, a film based on the book for children, /k^..?J^$r&e) by Walt Disney in 1961.

5      When I enteteelthe room, tw,o candidates y*1^^^..^^(inte^ew)^by^he general manager.           &

6      The investigation is.in progress now. We^jaily know that he m a y / f ^ . . : ^ : . . (kill)1?y a' drug-dealer.

7      The gallery is closed at the moment because the paintings ^ t ^ . A ^ . . . f l r e s t o r e j L /

8      Her future career seems ver/torpmising since she mhh^^A... (noticejWythe critics.

9      Memphis .^...I^VsS.x^V^now) for being the home of Blvis Presley. J

10    If s f a i r ^ ) L L $ ^ £ ^ t g i v e ) a second chance if your first attempt was unsuccessful.

'rite the sentences, replacing the lerlined parts with the correct idiom formed

with one of the words in the box.       (10 points) sj*eef>               fish ^ietf bee^-cat                 fly

She missed our house-warming party because she was very ill. dte.t^MJy&M.$.flQQ   ...:.'.

Tom is very keen on body-building. He never stops talking about it.. ^^„.ft^jJ^^..::.%

The Youngs are all very well educated,'Except' for Steven. He left school at the age of 16 and " his family considers him aJailure./-'   A gL..j^M$f^^^....$±$^.

She seems f u r i o u $ ' ^ t r n ^ . ; f g n M TT their fight secretly./ / '

v

            '         ; jw&$KJB73m


Our wedding was supposed to Be a secret bueZ he mentioned it unintentionally.

5     Mark is usually dressed in jeans and T-shirts. He feels very uncomfortable wearing formal clothes-    p^j&4

X.y Complete the sentences with the adjectives *7 from the box. There are three more adjectives / than you need.        (3 potfts)

         picturesque      stupntflg        grac^fot^haiidsoTfie

gippf sooi&rrg' magnificenj^tedious repetitive catetiy

Her dream is to get engaged to an intelligent and ...fatidmrn.. man. The point is to come up with a ... slogan for our new product. Everybody m

remember it.

Ann wilt make a good dancer. She has a

          Qp^Mm^M/. way of moving.                   ,

9 find classical music J^mSel^^nUm me feel calmer.

The next model's dress left us spee, less. It was absolutely pJti&dHUWi

Have you feally liked this Y./. ending? You must be very sentime

Their ancestors used to live in a ..

           Tudor house in the country.                 / ^ " ^ ^ J * .

mplete the sentences with appropriate

               s. Use only one word in each gap.               (7 points)

0 You don't need to MWJt. , we've got plenty of time.

0             Young children find it very difficult to stand

..jp:fi'l?r. for a long t i m c ^ T " I LJ^

2          She loves books so much. She is a real

Qp         We saw many sculptures, but only this one was

4 I couldn't stand the constant pressure and y( moved to the country to get out of the rat

t was early morning and the lecture was very

boring, so everybody started /\twf£$$i&u?iHis sister offered to help with ms financial problems               but          he      tiiw^he^^M^ff..... Don't         .....fi^^t-MpeopuTtfke           that!        It's very rude/ /

                         l/                      Total         30


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TEST 4   Reading

About beauty

Over the past three decades, the popular magazine

Psychology Today has conducted several surveys on how people feel about the appearance of their bodies. The changing results make for interesting reading. The dramatic changes in American culture

have significantly altered people's perceptions of themselves. In 1972, 23 per cent of American women

were dissatisfied with their appearance, but by 1997 that figure had risen to 56 per cent. In 1972, 15 per cent of men were dissatisfied with their appearance,

but by 1997 that figure had risen to 43 per cent.

Images of beauty are everywhere. Pictures of handsome men and beautiful women can be found in glossy magazines, on television, billboards, consumer products and the Internet. In the developed world

the incredibly strong interest in the body and beauty is intensifying. The beauty industry, despite nearly thirty years of feminism, is a multi-billion dollar a year business.

In the United Kingdom, visit any newsagent and you will find dozens of magazines on various aspects of style, fashion and health. There are several

magazines just devoted to the topic of hairstyles and hair care. Men's magazines tell men how to get flat stomachs and strong muscles. Images of slim, fit models seem to be everywhere and vast numbers of

women are overly concerned about their weight. Yet

despite this preoccupation with beauty and despite

the well-publicised health risks, over a third of Americans are extremely fat. The English are catching up quickly. But yet, while one third are extremely

fat, for others giving up food is a serious and potentially fatal mental health problem.


The images of beauty everywhere are not the average man or woman. Few ordinary people can aspire to look like the images of the exceptional beauties that the media presents us with. The models, actors and actresses are selected from the thousands who apply. They are statistically exceptional in their appearance. Not only do professional stylists and make-up artists spend hours doing their hair and make-up, but they spend hours in the gym. However, in films and soap operas, they are often placed in ordinary situations so that we all feel that they are our competition.

To suggest that we can either have something very beautiful and desirable if we purchase a car or look very beautiful and desirable if we use a certain hair conditioner and eye-makeup sells products very effectively. This is because it touches on some very deep-rooted worries in human psychology and offers an answer to them.

Feminists have blamed men and society. Socialists have blamed capitalists and the advertising industry. But what is really going on? Why are both men and women more preoccupied, more anxious, about being beautiful these days than ever before?

To be beautiful is presented as being the answer to a problem. The developed countries of the world are going through a period of great turbulence. Just as the Industrial Revolution of the 1800s led to

great changes in society, so too is the Information Revolution of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries. And it is happening fast.

For hundreds of thousands of years our ancestors were hunter-gatherers. Civilisation and cities are only a few thousand years old. Just as our bodies evolved over those countless millennia in order to adapt and survive, so did our psychologies. The reasons why it is so important for women to be beautiful and men to be strong and handsome are deeply rooted in the human psyche and are the product of hundreds of thousands of years of evolution.

Task 1

Read the article and decide if the statements are true (T) or false (F)- (5 points)

1      In twenty-five years, the number of American women dissatisfied with their

          looks has decreased radically.                    T / F

2      Because of thirty years of feminism, the beauty industry is no longer a money-making

          business.                                                    T/F

3      There are people who spend a lot of time maintaining the exceptional beauty of

          models and actors.                                    T / F

4      We are often convinced that buying a certain make or brand of a product will

          make us look more attractive.                      T/F

5      The importance of feeling beautiful is deeply rooted in the human mind. T / F


                                                                         PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


Task 2

Read again and answer the questions.    (5 points)

1      What instruction can men get from men's magazines?

2      What is the estimated number of Americans whose bodies are very fat?

3      What can be a potential threat for many people dissatisfied with their appearance?

4      Why are the exceptional beauties in television entertainment placed in ordinary situations? 5 What have the Industrial and Information

Revolutions led to in the last few centuries?

 

10

Total

TEST 4      Writing

Task


Write a review of a film you have seen recently. Your work may consist of 200-250 words. Do not exceed the word limit. Include the following information.

basic information about the film (title, director, starring actors, etc.) a brief summary of the plot and the main characters your opinions - good and bad points about the film (music, special effects, etc.) a conclusion and recommendation (e.g. for whom you'd recommend the film)

Useful expressions:

atf things considered, although, however, in the end,

moreover, of course, one day, such as, which, who, nevertheless, either ... or, neither ... nor

Total [ |20|

PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST B      Use of English

A Read the text and put the verbs in brackets in the Active or Passive Voice in the correct

tense.                                                      (13 points)

Curitiba, in southern Brazil, is typical of many developing cities. After 1950, it (0) GhfflgG&.....

(chajigej |gnta£fcaUy as its economy, which

(85 :?rr?fe. J^^*(base) on agriculture,

(2) t-&4a^$Sf*4o>°ve) into the industrial stage.

As in many other cities, this change

(3U&3U£&S«... (create) poverty, but Curitiba

Our biology teacher-made-a great influence on Tom's future career.

4      Ma             pupils use their mobile phones at school

&co~nsidered unacceptable.

Richard used to be crazy about British rock groups such as The Rolling Stones.


(4)\/K^£^ft^Toianage) to control the problems that go with it, like crime and lack of education.

 

 

Other typical urban problems ffl)to!l£&Lh&lt+J (avoidfarweLl. The most striking feature of Curitiba is its transport system. Private cars

(6^£fl.L: (not allow^to the city centre, and the bus network is fast and efficient. Ticket prices ^ j f e ^ ^ ^ . f e . M e e p ) low so people on low incom^ can use the network. Curitiba ( ^ J g A a A A . (recycle) 70 per cent, of its rubbish, arid the whole population (9) ..fe (ihvolve)Nn collecting it. The man responsible for

Curitiba's development is the city's mayor/Jainae^»-

7

I read an article*, an article*.wWcOiscussed the issue of euthanasia in some depth.

He was s?££i unpredictable that Ann decided to break off her engagement.

8, I got fed up with being criticised by people from other advertising agpfTcies.

Lerner. He says that Curitiba m ^ ^ & ^ t S t \veA^. ,

(make) responsible for improving the city. Jo d o ,

command of a foreign Language.

that, he says, the poor must #2) .W.M£C...

(give) good services so they {13) ...bfe^oA.....

(share) in improving the quality of life.

(Adapted from BBC English)

0^ There are mistakes in seven out of these ten sentences. Re-write them correctly. (10 points)

<f

10 \l Fresh evidence suggests that the woman ma/W-,

          forced to commit suicide.                                     : •

/v.

Complete the idioms with one appropriate

I. Then explain in English the meaning of

each idiom,                                              (9 points)

0 She was as sick as a

Sftot^,ytw.itL

            It's a pity he let the cat out of the .<        Vu-

2      ' Margaret has always been the black l^.M^.

of the family.

3      I'm not going to join the rat XU?!^:.

She has a bee in her dancing.

o 00

My boyfriend, which father is a scientist wants to study mathematics.

...d^.&JK/Jfe^

...w^^.M^M4^.f^^^Mi^.-.

He made a few suggestions about how we could spend the money. correct

Roosevelt that be ecame famous for his military achievements, was the 26th president of the US.

I'd like John to come to our party. He tells ia funny jokes.


(succeed) because everyone (#) fjtCS!!!S3*^S^ W Ther* *re a *<* °f teenagers who have a good

                                                                     PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


5      My Scottish niece, who only speaks English, feels like a fish out of ^ ^ 0 when she

goes abroad.

6      I wish I could be a fly on the ..tiSSM* during their meeting.

Match the words from two columns to form

         aningful expressions.                                       (3 points)

0      wrap up

1\ get on tp go out with

jtj     somebody's mother in personality

^•Itf a very handsome man

G) an hour early for the meeting

f

turn down d) the gift in coloured paper take after e) in years

5^ come across              f)       as a very intelligent person

&^( turn up                           g) the request for a pay rise

mplete the text with the correct word.

(5 points)

Mr Smith made/Jjofjangry the very moment he saw her.

My mother voiced her objection to my plan to


^plerc&'varnish my eats. V, Since they were ^tndj^/tfr^^> across the lawn, I was soon left behind. The catchygswjstefr plot of the film made everybody scared.

I tried taking sleeping pills but they didn't make/fittve^iny effect.

£

They dicln't buy anything there because the shop soldd^^^^^yt>uvenirs.*'y^JCii.y We stoppedonTtirwayto admire very <pictaf4squ^/attractive       countryside.

ft WhejiJiaxbara was pregnant, sheave/it o

eets and sugar.

indolent customer made a complaint

to the manager—\

9        Why are yoi^amuhg/shnekingl Are you bored with what I'm saying?

10      Your hairstyle is a bit ta5tetes$3at0. Itjjras_ fashionable many years ago.

 

40

Total

PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


3 Styb. if- 3wfy

TEST B Writing Task

Look at the drawing and speculate about the kind of person who could live in this place. Write a description four paragraphs long about the person and the room. Your work may consist of 200-250 words. Do not exceed the word limit. Include the following information:


the room itself (furniture, arrangement and decoration) the person's age the person's tikes and dislikes and how they are reflected in the choice of objects in the room the person's character and how it is reflected in the room arrangement the person's moods and ways of spending time in the room

. In your description include:

expressions: veiy, a bit (too), quite, rather, absolutely, much, slightty, fairly, pretty,

extremely, totally, completely, realty, etc.

examples of relative clauses

structures with so and such

                                                                                 Total           20


                                                                         PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST B      Reading

Welcome to SKIN DEEP - The art of the tattoo

While its meaning has varied from people to people and from place to place, tattooing has most often served as a sign of social status, as a mark of one's passage through life, or simply as a way to beautify the body. Tattooing had existed for thousands of

years before England's Captain Cook found it in the South Pacific in 1769, but it was his crew and other merchant and naval seamen like him who soon

spread the art to Europe and America.

(1         ) The close relationship between naval men and tattooing developed quickly after Cook's voyages to the South Pacific. At first, sailors' tattoos

were drawn by native tattooists; then sailors began to tattoo each other aboard ship. Eventually, professional tattoo shops, many of them established by former sailors, appeared in port cities around the world. The practice became so entrenched among seamen that it is estimated that by the end of the nineteenth century 90 per cent of all sailors in the United States Navy had tattoos.

(2         ) By the second half of the nineteenth century, tattoos were still largely viewed as shocking and frightful, the mark of a person exiled from

society. Popular magazines of the time printed articles such as The Savage Origin of Tattooing' that

linked tattooing with cannibals, criminals and lunatics. However, by the dawn of the twentieth

century, a number of circumstances had arisen that together helped prompt the spread of tattooing. An electric tattooing machine patented in 1891 allowed for easier, faster, and more decorative tattooing. In Europe and America, fascination with the new and unusual grew as restrictive Victorian social norms fell away. It was in this environment that tattoo artists set up shops and made the art of tattooing available

to the brave, the curious and the impulsive.

(3        •„.) Prejudice often influenced sailors' choice of tattoo design. Roosters were thought to protect sailors from drowning. The Christian cross

tattooed on the feet was thought to guard against shark attack. Yet another superstitious custom held that sailors should be tattooed with the image of a dragon when they crossed the international date line. While tattoo imagery was often superstitious in nature, getting tattooed was also a highly practical decision: it increased the chance of a body being

identified if lost overboard,

(4      


) Just as sailors brought the tattoo to America from exotic ports of call, the circus and side show took the tattoo across the country. Circus and side show performers often wore tattoos as a way of increasing their appeal to audiences and thus

improving their earnings. As early as 1884, carnivals, side shows, circuses and travelling fairs were

advertising tattooed performers among their acts. During the Depression, some tattoo artists who were unable to support themselves travelled with circuses and side shows. As the American public lost interest in the carnival side show, many tattoo celebrities

joined larger circuses or opened their own tattoo parlours.

(5        ) During the American Civil War, patriotic themes became very popular. Tattoos commemorating the battle between the Monitor and the Virginia (formerly the Merrimack) and the Alabama and the Kearsarge began appearing on sailors' chests and backs. Flags and eagles became popular symbols. Tattoos also reflected the navy's transition from sail to steam.

Once regarded in the West as frightening and unpleasant, the tattoo has enjoyed great popularity

in our own culture in recent years. Everywhere we

look today - movies, advertisements, television there are signs that people of all walks of life appreciate and practise the art of the tattoo.

Task 1

Read the article and match the paragraphs (1-5) with the headings (A-E). (5 points)

Paragraph 1

A      The Tattoo in the Circus and

Paragraph 2

Side Show

Paragraph 3

B     Tattoo: the Mark of the Sailor

Paragraph 4

C   Patriotic Symbols

Paragraph 5

D The Spread of Tattooing

                                    E    The Role of Superstition

Task 2

Read again and answer the questions.     (5 points)

1      Who was first to draw sailors' tattoos?

2      What happened in 1891?

3      What tattoo was supposed to protect sailors against the attack of sharks?

4      Why did circus and side-show performers wear tattoos?

5      What were the most popular tattoos during the Civil War?

                                                                                Total         10


PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                                                 


TEST B      Listening

Task 1

Listen to two people giving their opinions about a film they have seen recently. Match each opinion (1-5) with the person who said it.

(5 points)

Opinion

Woman

 Man

Both

1 The film was predictable.

 

 

 

2 I liked the comic element in the film.

 

 

 

3 The film could have been shorter.

 

 

 

4 I believed this magical little country really existed.

 

 

 

5 I think young people would enjoy the film.

 

 

 

TEST B      Speaking

Task

Work with your partner. Exchange information and opinions about the styles.

Student A

Tell your partner about the following things:

the hairstyles you like/dislike

your opinion about body-piercing

your opinion about following fashion your opinion about the latest trends in interior design

When you need time to think about what you want to say, use the following expressions:

right, well, you know, kind of, sort of. Let me think

for a moment, I know what you mean. That's very

true


Task 2

Listen again and decide if the statements are

true (T) or false (F).                                      (5 points)

1      The woman went to the cinema with

              her husband.                                              T / F

2      The man loved the storyline in the

              film.                                                             T/F

3      She found the music in the film more suitable for the younger generation. T / F

4      He thinks Julia Roberts is a talented

              actress.                                                      T / F

5      He believes that the film could have

             exploited bad characters more.                    T / F

                                                                                   Total       hol

_J

S Student B

Tell your partner about the following things:

the clothes you like/dislike wearing your opinion about wearing tattoos

your opinion about following food diets your opinion about the latest trends in music

When you need time to think about what you want to say, use the following expressions:

right, welt, you know, kind of, sort of. Let me think

for a moment, I know what you mean, That's very

true

                                                                                   Total          20


                                 PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 5          Use of English

•J& Put the verbs in brackets in the correct form

to express future events.                                           (8 points)

0      Don't help me. Daddy. I           willtM      (do) it myself!       .               -

1      By the year 2020, scientists MJ££LfS!r*4 (find) a cure for AIDS. (I

Don't be late! The train „ J f c f t ! ^ (leave) at eight sharp.

The boat is half filled with water. It iUL... ': 1-^ (sink) in a minute!

Yodll be.given a new credit card only aftei~ucuj_

/

w\lf}£s$$£! (fill out) this applicattorfform. Thanks a lot for the loan. I ' ^ a

Y'- (p v)

you back next month. * \

6        J World War III 'A reak gptj in the near future. Bust's no^vgry, likely, I think.

7        We're late. The pjav ^ ^ f ^ ^ t a r t ) by the time we get to the tfieatre.

8        / You'll recognise him when you see him. I'm sure

-

 heffi M .i?i$.C... (wear) tails.

<f> Use the expressions i(\ brackets to complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence. (5 points)

0      The worker sued his employer because he wanted to get some compensation, (so as to)

The worker sued his employer .J&M&.$&

SPMbMMfi&MftfMtk

1      The professor is seriously ill so our final exam has been postponed, (due to) Our final exam has been postponed J & a * J z l .

,,jMo#.£.j^.£.zSX,&./£?J$fa.3(.t.

b whistle' because he wanted to

attract the girl's attention, (in order to)

Tom          started      to        whistle        J^.S^SRJMLjSiw^L

Take something to read with you because you might have some free time, (in case)

Take something to read with you               ****

£the roachWas slippery and thafs why we didn't arrive in London on time, (because of)

 

We didn't arrive in London on time 1*S^6*

recollecting mc/ne^ for^wedding present for Oohn and Mary, (so that) .

.

I'm collecting m o n e y / 9 T . . M ± ^ , ^ ^ ^

C, Complete the idioms with one appropriate word. Then explain In English the meaning of

each idiom.                                                                    (6 points)

0      My in-laws have travelled to the four .mtim. of the globe.

My. .w&r.&WWT. .fete h$**U. tiMr, f>.v$?.. £k&. MtftfMtt

1     


The research into the life of this writer is still in ±iS. infancy.

2      That job was a stepping           in my career.

3      The sky's the to what you can achieve in this field.

4      Five years of working away from home have certainly left their on her.

Complete the text below with one word (a verb or a particle) in each gap. (7 points)

My boyfriend and I get (0) Mk           fine. Well, most of the time! Yesterday we had a terrible fight.

He accused me (1)           « £ L ^ . . . . giving

(2) ..0*™*ity£..... his secret? I remember he'd asked me not to tell anybody about his trip but what I told his dad had to (3) „&£. with his plans, and not the actual journey, peter couldn't make (4) . . . T ^ ^ ^ f e ^ w n a t ' I was trying to explain and (5) ../A)™fr*.fr..... out in the middle of our heated discussion. I felt terrible and decided to make

(6) /£$*?.. for what I had done by buying him a CD of his favourite band. He didn't have it yet as it had (7) ..^(ft!ftf<U(CkM4^)ut only a week before. Peter

accepted my apologies and I learned my lesson. Next time my lips will be sealed!

Match the words from two columns to form

compound nouns.

(4 points)

0           human lfr black

2 ^ artificial

3X"DNA

4g,data

5f\ electric

6 flight 7 £ solar

8 3> search

a ^ current

$

$

d)

fi

-4)

<#

>y

i)>

engine intelligence genome system

year processing

hole molecule

Total


PHOTOCOPIABI.E-: CO Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 5     Listening

Task

Listen to a shop assistant in a toy shop reading package descriptions of two toys and fill in the notes below. You will hear the conversation

twice.

Poo-Chi

He sits. He sings. He even dances on his tiptoes.

And he won't chew up the couch. He is a smart

(1) His sensors make him react to light, sound and touch. (2) separate

motors give him the ability to do all the doggie basics - tail wagging, ear flapping and stretching. ... Feed him with the included bone and he'll sing

up to (3)                       different songs. Poo-Chi also

speaks to and interacts with other Poo-Chis. He is

(4)                       inches high, 6.5 inches long and

he costs (5)

Meow-Chi

She's a totally (6) toy cat with a

moving head, ears, legs and mouth. Meow-Chi meows sings, stands, sits, wiggles her ears, moves her paws and even dances on her tiptoes! Meow-Chi senses (7) , sounds and your special touch!

Her animated eyes show emotion from happiness to sadness to love. ... Meow-Chi loves playing with her

play (8)                        and responds with happy eyes

and wiggling ears! She can speak, sing

(9)                        different songs and interact with

other Robo-Chi animals! Meow-Chi stands 5 inches

high and (10)                       long and she also costs

$29.99.

Total f iwl



TEST 5      Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

Student A

Explain to your partner why you believe in one of the following :

It is important to practise sports.

It is important to have friends. It is important to support anti-racist movements.

Your partner may ask for clarification:

What I don't quite understand

So does that mean ...?                                        

Could you explain how ..•?

Use the following expressions to give clarification:

In other words

(What) That means

Is that clear?

What I'm trying to say

To put it another way

What I'm getting at

What I mean is

I mean, etc.

Student B                                                            •*Z

Explain to your partner why you believe in one of the following :

It is important to have brothers and sisters.

It is important to plan your future.

Films of violence shouldn't be shown on TV.

Your partner may ask for clarification:

What I don't quite understand So does that mean ...?

Could you explain how ...?

Use the following expressions to give clarification:

In other words

(What) That means

Is that clear?

What I'm trying to say

To put it another way

What I'm getting at

What I mean is

I mean, etc.

                                                                                  Total I      20


                                  PHOTOCOPIASLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 6      Use of English

'•&, Complete these conditional sentences with the correct tense of the verbs in brackets.

(14 points)

0      I can't afford this car; If I .£<KKA£ (earn) more, I ...mti&.bfty... (buy) it for you.

1      If Martina Hingis #&A}.ifJ!&*l (not win) the women's singles competition at Wimbledon in 1997, she ^O^tKxJML (not be) a worldfamous tennis player now.

2      You^...fyAj            (get) soaked to the skin unless you ./**fe^           (take) a raincoat with

3      Ann          Jm^:i^\^dl^fmx^\A^on%\np with George a long time ago if she ..JKB*fetK!>... (be) more mature.

4      If Isaac Newton (not observefan apple falling down from a tree, he .ASHteidkiit.. JfoSaiscovei^avity.

5      If our students .«$&**&....... (attend) all the classes regularly, they usually .K&fit.L* (have) no problems passing the final exam.

6      The boss is mad as hell with you. If I s^fa^y,,

...•w^....^n^(be) you, I / f ^ ^ . . . f ^ * ^ t ' down) tdAvritinglJ>e financial report right now.

7      I /&mfd/.$^\i§pzV) two foreign languages fluently now if I & ^ . y ^ : ^ s t a r t ) to learn them when I was a child.

*&, Use the word in brackets to combine two

sentences into one.                                    (5 points)

0      Ann is not a very diligent student. Her essays are usually well thought-out. (although)

6^.L&Sfy$M&M!Udty.m&A^terM.

%U^6k^jh&MJ^jkMc^,4Mi^ii.^4^L,..

1      I kept cheating on the test by copying answers from Tom. I knew that I could be expelled from school for this. (despite)

2      There has been very little demand for tickets.

The performance hasn't been cancelled.

(even though)


The museum houses one of the finest collections of coins. It doesn't have a single piece of armour, (on the other hand)

4      His fans criticised the quality of his latest songs. He decided to carry on recording similar numbers, (in spite of)

5      In the survey, some people favoured higher taxes and free education. Others demanded tax cuts and wanted students to pay for their studies themselves, (whereas)

*&j Complete the definitions using one word in

each gap.                                                 (11 points)

0      The organ inside your head which enables you to think - k(m.

1      The line of bones down the centre of the back that provides support for the body -

.MJteSx-,

2        An infectious illness similar to a bad cold, it often causes a fever - ..J*^....3®..?£&A-»'

3        The part of theJ)Ody between the hand and the arm -J^iQftx.

4        Two organs in the chest with which we can breathe - .&*#$**>.

5        An infectious disease that produces red spots on the skin and a high temperature -

6        Two small organs in the body which take away waste matter from the blood to produce urine -

7        A serious infectious disease which often causes paralysis - .^ttfe£.

8        } The curved tones that go from your backbone to your chest - ..f*t&...

9        The smallest basic unit of a plant or animal -

...uSL.

10     A condition in which the contents of your bowels are emptied too often and you need to go to the toilet frequently -

11     Something inside your body which connects two different bones and is used to produce movement -   J$®^../af»*tAU^

                                                                                 Total         30


PHOTOCOP1ABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                


TEST 6      Reading

Comfort and joy - Reading can be an easy way to help a baby's brain grow

by Hillary Clinton, First Lady and wife of the US President Bilt Clinton (1997)

The night after the Inaugural, Bill and I gathered with our family in the solarium on the third floor of

the White House. After dinner our toddler nephews

Tyler and Zachary climbed up on the couch with their Uncle Bill to hear him read a story. They accompanied him with words, sounds, pointed fingers and a few fights over who would hold the book. As I watched them, I thought of all the times Bill and I used to take turns reading stories to Chelsea. Every night one of us (and occasionally both) would stretch out on her bed, hold her in our

arms, and either read or make up new tales about imaginary characters who had improbable but

breathtaking adventures.

(1 )

Today, thanks to advances in brain research, we know that reading with a child has intellectual,

emotional and physical benefits that can improve the child's development. Sharing stories strengthens the emotional bonds between a parent and child, helps a child learn words and concepts, and actually stimulates the growth of a baby's brain.

(2 )

Thaf s why doctors and nurses are starting to prescribe reading to babies along with regular

checkups and vaccinations. Recently I went to

Georgetown University's Medical Center with Maurice Sendak, the renowned children's author and illustrator. His book Where the Wild Things Are was one of Chelsea's - and Bill's - favourites. Mr Sendak read the story to children, and I announced, along with representatives of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Booksellers Association and the American Library Association, a national campaign to put books in the hands of parents who bring their young children to the doctor, and to get

doctors to prescribe daily reading. My husband and I will be discussing this and other activities to follow up on the latest findings about the brain at a White House conference in the spring.

(3 )


Reading to a child while touching, hugging and holding him or her can help a child deal with the impersonal tendencies of the information age - for

both the adult and the child. While critical to

building brains, reading is equally important to building trusting and close relationships. Thafs why many of us remember the warm arms that held us

when we read books as children. And thafs why reading should not be viewed only as an intellectual activity, particularly in the era in which we now live.

(4 )

It isn't very often that we have before us such a simple, inexpensive and pleasurable way to improve our children's health and development and raise their prospects for a brighter future. Whether you lie down together on the rug, sit together in an old rocking chair or cuddle on your child's bed the way Bill and I used to with Chelsea, there is no better way to spend time than reading to your child.

And now we also know that there are few better ways to help your baby's brain grow.

(Adapted from Time)

Task 1

Match the missing paragraphs (A-D) with the

gaps in the text (1-4).                                                (4 points)

A   It's important that we take to heart what the neurosdentists are telling us - without losing the heart of the reading experience. In today's high-

tech world of email and microchips, it is easy to forget the importance of human connections in our daily activities. Technology has brought many welcome improvements to our lives. But it has the potential to create feelings of distance and isolation among us.

B   If Americans take away only one lesson from these exciting scientific discoveries, I hope if s that reading to children is easy, affordable and possible for most parents no matter what their level of

education or economic station in life. Children's books are available for free at public Libraries in every community and can be found at reasonable prices in many bookstores. Doctors, librarians,

teachers, book publishers, business leaders and the news media can help make books available to families and educate parents about the vital role that reading plays in our children's lives.

C  Bill and I did not know about brain cells or the newest discoveries in neuroscience. Reading to Chelsea became a daily ritual because if s what our own parents and grandparents had done with us, and because we wanted to spend quiet time with


                                                     PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


her every day. Bill's grandmother thought that

reading to him would help him develop a strong vocabulary and the language skills he would need later on in school. My mother and father were of the same opinion, and to this day I remember the feelings of security and comfort that I felt sitting in my grandfather's lap when he read stories to my brothers and me.

D  As I discussed in my book. It Takes a Village, scientists have discovered that children whose parents read and talk to them during the first

three years of life create a stronger foundation for future reading success. In other words, what our parents and grandparents knew instinctively is now backed up by hard scientific evidence.

Task 2

Read the text again and circle the correct answer, a), b) or c).           (6 points)

1      Chelsea had the stories read to her by

a)     her uncle.

b)     her parents.

c)     her nephews.

2      Reading with a child

a)     develops the child's vocabulary.

b)     reduces the stress of vaccinations.

c)     creates a basis for future professional success.

The national campaign to get doctors to prescribe daily reading was started by a) Bill Clinton.

b)    Hillary Clinton.

c)    Maurice Sendak.

In the modern era of technology, email and microchips

a)      make it easy to create new bonds and

relationships.

b)      are an antidote to the boredom of passive listening to the same stories.

c)     


can make you feel distant and isoLated from other people.

The feelings that arise in a child during the reading experience are those of a) security and comfort.

b)                  intellectual growth.

c)                  distance and isolation. Scientific discoveries confirm that

a)    books for children can be found at public libraries in every community.

b)    there's no easier way for parents to educate their children during the first three years of life than reading books,

C) the level of parents' education and their economic situation influences the amount of time they spend with their children.

 

10

Total 


TEST 6     Writing

Task

You have found out that the local town authorities are planning to build a new housing

estate in the suburbs. It is to consist of high blocks of flats which are cheap to build and additionally may solve the housing problem in your area. Write a 200-250 word discursive essay in which you either support or criticise this idea. Give arguments for or against it.

Before you start writing, think of the following things:

the title of your essay the number of paragraphs the arguments against the arguments in favour the choice of vocabulary and structures to use the conclusion

Useful expressions:

although, despite, in spite of, even though, on the other hand, on the contrary, whereas

 

20

Total


PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                  


TEST C     Use of English

| j ^ There are mistakes in seven out of these ten sentences. Find them and re-write the sentences correctly.             (10 points)

0 I'll apologise to her only if I will feel like doing it.

00 They started to whisper so they would not wake up the little girl.

## cffW&&

1        If she hadn't won the beauty contest in 1998, she wouldn't have been so famous now.

2        Due to his mother criticised Tom's choice, he decided to apply for another job.

3        On our next wedding anniversary, we will have been married for twenty years.

4        I'm almost sure the new academic year starts on 3rd October.

5        This time next week I'll get a suntan on one of the sandy beaches in California.

6        If I were you, I would have your car serviced a long time ago.

7        Have you heard the news? Barbara will have a baby!

8        What would you do if your mother would decide to send you to boarding school?

9        We decided to install a burglar alarm in case some thief wants to break in.

10     The situation will get even worse unless the government will be changed soon.

Complete the following sentences with the correct multi-part verb formed from one of the

verbs given in the box. (8 points) bring find get give go make put take wwtfe

0         I'd like you to .....«##?: d#fflk... every single word the lecturer says.

1        


Never until tomorrow what

you can do today!

2         The pilot allowed the little boy to the controls of the plane for a few

minutes.

3         My ex-boyfriend was the last person to about my wedding plans.

4         I'm sorry I haven't booked a ticket for you. I'll it       to you next time.

5         We must   these two

chapters again. I don't remember anything.

6         The speaker did her best but she didn't manage to her message

7         Don't tell me everything. If you the ending of the story, I'll be bored

in the cinema.

8         Why didn't you your previous job experience while they were

considering you for this position?

%j Circle the correct alternative in each

sentence.                                                  (3 points)

0      The sun/sojo^ system was formed some

4.5 billion years ago.

1      John can't walk properly because he has fallen over andsorained h\s^f^/bone.

2      A ce/i^eOfomis a partoTthe nervous system that ca>Resinformation between the brain and other parts of the body.

3      The overall picture of this branch of industry is very promising since the newjjjnpvation is considered to be a mai<fcbreakthrough/setback.

4      MeaslejJPffeumoniciyffects your lungs and makes itdifficult to breathe.

5      She saved her child by grabbing him by the rib/Qrjst/antl pulling him away from the oncoming traffic.

6      Nobody can now predict thefoutconfc the terrorist attacks in the US^

Complete the compound words in the

sentences.                                                (8 points)

0      When you are in a group, you should know how to get on with your fellow human kft&Mjs.

1      There was an accident because the worker forgot to switch off the electric

before touching the machine.

2      Tom -checked the door to make sure he had locked it.

3      Her latest work was very interesting but it couldn't be considered ground-


                                 PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


4      This training is good but time-

And we're in need of an expert right now.

5      The new Laws will have farimplications for all blue-collar workers.

6      A fifteen- -old student staged a public protest against animal experiments.

7      They showed a replay of a butterfly's development in slow

8       intelligence is a branch of computer science which aims to make computers do things that humans can do.

E, Read the text below and think of the word which best fits each space. Use only one word in each gap.        (11 points)

My friend Tom is very keen (0) <>& travelling. In fact, he has already travelled to the four corners

of the (1) Five years ago he came (2) with the idea of going to Africa on his own, even (3) he realised it was not a particularly safe thing to do. The (4) is the limit to where you can go if you are prepared to take risks,' said Tom and then he got

(5) to work. He bought a plane ticket to

Khartoum, collected all the necessary equipment, mapped out his route and was ready to set off. In

(6)  of all his preparations and

enthusiasm, the trip finished soon after it began. In one of the Sudanese villages Tom (7) down with malaria, one of the tropical

(8) very common in this part of the

world. It was obviously his fault since he had

forgotten to have several vaccinations before going to the tropics. This trip has certainly (9)


its mark on Tom. (10) of his medical record, he has to be examined at least once a year. He also plans all his journeys well in advance

 

40

(11) that he can be sure he hasn't overlooked anything important.


Total

TEST C    Writing

Task

 

Write a five-para graph article for your school monthly magazine The World Around Us on one

of the following subjects. Your work may consist of 200-250 words. Do not exceed the word limit

Remember to structure your article appropriately.

Include:

the introduction (write the topic and say why it is important or interesting) the background or history (write about the

beginnings and major developments up to now)

the present time (write what is happening at the moment)

the future (write how things will develop)

the conclusion (summarise the main points and

say again why the subject will continue to be

important)

Useful expressions:

according to, also, although, as a result, for example,

furthermore, nevertheless, however, in addition,

moreover, because (of), due to, caused by, in case, in order to, so as (not) to, in this way, to sum up, in conclusion, etc.

A

B

C

Safety on the road: it's not difficult to ensure in school areas!

Keep the Earth clean and green! We achieved it in our local area.

Animals around us: our school helps to protect homeless animals.

 

20

Total 

PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                                                             


TEST C    Reading

Space tourism

Many people still think that to get the chance to go to space you've got to try to be an astronaut. Unfortunately, the chance of becoming a government astronaut is tiny, simply because there are so few and there's no prospect of a lot more being employed.

However, don't despair. Far more people will go to space as visitors. But it will be expensive, so you had better start saving your money. The price of a return flight to Earth may drop from what it costs now, but estimates vary. The target of the Space Tourism Study Program of the Japanese Rocket Society is to bring the price down to about 1 million yen (about US$10,000), on a turnover of about

1              million passengers per year. However, the demand is expected to be so strong that in the early stages prices will be considerably higher - perhaps 5 million

yen ($50,000). As the number of vehicles grows, the number of flights will increase, and prices will fall to

2              million yen over 5-10 years, and then to 1 million yen if possible.

We know that most people would like to stay in orbit for a few days or more. And this stands to

reason, if you're paying $20,000 for your trip to

orbit! So in order for space tourism to reach its full potential, there's going to be a need for orbital

accommodation - or space hotels. These will grow through phases, starting with 'lodges' for up to about 100 guests, growing to true hotels of several hundred guests, and eventually to orbiting 'theme parks' for many thousands of guests.

What would a space hotel actually be like to visit? Hotels in orbit will offer the services you expect from a hotel: private rooms, meals, bars. But they'll also offer fantastic views of Earth and space and the

endless entertainment of space-walking. A trip to a hotel will start with launch to orbit, which takes


about five minutes of powered acceleration, followed by up to a few hours of weightlessness approaching the hotel (depending on the flight schedule). Docking will be rather like an airliner parking at an airport - but you'll leave the cabin floating in zero-G (zero gravity) along the access tube, holding onto a cable with your hands!

Of course all good things have to come to an end, unfortunately. And so after a few days you'll find

yourself heading back through the docking point to the returning vehicle - though you'll be much more

expert at manoeuvring in zero-G than you were when you arrived! You'll be thinking how soon you can save up enough to get back up again - or maybe you should change jobs to get to work in an orbiting hotel!

Task 1

Read the text about space tourism and decide if the statements are true (T) or false (F) or if there is no information (Nl). (6 points)

1      The only way to travel to space in the future is to become a government

          astronaut.                                            T / F / NI

2      With the growing number of spacecrafts and flights, the prices

           of tickets will fall.                                  T / F / NI

3      In time, family tickets will be

          introduced.                                           T / F / NI

4      Orbiting theme parks will be the first type of hotels to be built in space. T / F / NI

5      It will take five minutes to get to

           the orbit.                                              T / F / NI

6      During your space trip, you'll receive the best services provided by the

International Space Tourism

          Organisation.                                         T/ F/ NI

Task 2

Read again and answer the questions.     (4 points)

1      How many passengers does the Japanese Rocket Society aim to receive in space yearly?

2      How much time would the majority of travellers like to spend in space?

3      What extraordinary things would you be able to experience in a space hotel?

4      What is the spaceship docking compared to?

                                                                                Total         10


4        PHOTOCOPIABLE ® Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST C     Listening

Task

Listen to a story of a few inventions and complete the gaps in their descriptions.

In 1893, a Chicago citizen by the name of Whitcomb Judson was tired of constantly lacing and unlacing

his (1)                           He thought it would be a good

idea to come up with a quicker and easier way of

fastening them. He (2)                        a special

device made up of locking metal teeth, thus creating the world's first zipper (or 'zip', as it's called in Britain). ...

By (3) , eyeglasses were invented at

the same time in Italy and China in the thirteenth century. Unfortunately, we don't know the names of these inventors. In the Middle Ages, glasses were worn primarily as (4)

The wristwatch, like many other inventions, came

into existence by (5) A woman sitting

in a park tied a small portable clock to her wrist, freeing both hands to care for her child. A Swiss

clock-maker saw this and (6) a

wristwatch. All this happened around 1790, but it wasn't until 100 years later that wristwatches became popular.

Paper was invented in the year 105 by a man called Ts'ai Lun. After various (7) , he

created a completely new writing material from old fishnets, rags and bamboo wood. This material was paper. The Chinese guarded the secret of papermaking for a very long time. Six centuries Later, the

Arabs managed to (8) some Chinese

soldiers who knew the secret formula. The Arabs brought paper to Spain and in time it spread around Europe.

Ice cream existed centuries before anybody had

heard of (9) and freezers. Roman

emperors had snow brought to their palaces from the nearby mountains, and added honey and fruit


juices to form an iced dessert. Real ice cream made with cream was invented in Italy in the

(10) century. The ice-cream cone was

invented in 1904 in America. Before that, ice cream was eaten in the form of a sandwich between two

pieces of wafer.

(Adapted from The World of English}

                                                                                TotaL        10


TEST C     Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

Student A

You want to share two problems with your partner.

Explain the situations and ask your partner for advice.

1        You are invited to a party on Friday afternoon. Earlier you promised your sister to help her decorate her new flat, telling her it was the only free afternoon you could share with her.

2        You have forgotten about your friend's birthday.

Useful words and expressions:

must (not), ought (not) to, should (not), could (not), have got to, need to, There's no point, what tips, advise. If I were you, it's important, con be counterproductive etc.

Student B

You want to share two problems with your partner.

Explain the situations and ask your partner for advice.

1      You were supposed to visit your uncle in hospital, but you have been very busy recently

and you forgot about it.

2      You have lent your brother's favourite CD to somebody, but you can't remember who

borrowed it.

i

Useful words and expressions:

must (not), ought (not) to, should (not), could (not), have got to, need to. There's no point, what tips, advise. If I were you, it's important, can be counterproductive, etc.

                                                                                    Total        20


PHOTQCOPIABLE Co Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                


TEST 7       Use of English

Put the verbs in brackets in the correct form.

(12 points)

I can't stand *%$$#$. (visit) museums of natural history.

I'm not an early bird but I've got used to (get up) at dawn.

Tom is looking forward to

(visit) his friend in Paris next summer.

The teacher refused ... (take part) in our outing.

For several moments I watched them

(fight) one another in the gym, but 1 left before they finished.

When I was younger I used to (vote) for the Green Party.

I regretted      (not give) a chance to apologise for my misbehaviour.

I saw Ann (enter) the university building. There is only one programme worth

(watch) today - the documentary on Mexican refugees.

They finally decided (take out) a mortgage on their house.

10        Everybody stopped (work) when they heard ambulance sirens.

11        It's no use (worry) about it. You can't do anything to change it,

12        A passer-by managed (give) first aid to the wounded.


B Complete the table with the opposites formed from the words provided. (8 points) Complete the sentences with one word in

each gap.                                                  (6 points)

0      We need to           .$&.      in touch before the meeting.

1      To my mind these rules and regulations are

• unfair but I'm going to keep them.

2      My little nieces were always very excited to set on a camping trip.

3      Because of the blizzard, all planes were cancelled for two days and we had to over in a hotel.

4      They left five minutes earlier so I had to run to up with them.

5      We decided to stop in New York for a couple of days before heading for Rhode Island.

6      It would be great if you could me up at my place at about eight.

Sfc, Match the words from two columns to form

compound words.                                    (4 points)

0      wide open N.         a) views

1      bustling     *"\         b) bag

2      breathtaking          \.          c)         melting-pot

3      delicious   ^ d)       spaces

4      snow-capped        e) buildings

5      teeming    f)          streets

6      sleeping    g) with wildlife

7      historic      h) food

8      cultural     i)          mountains

agree

 

dUaarU'

spoiled/spoilt

 

 

organised

 

 

experienced

 

 

legal

 

 

pack

 

 

patient

 

 

responsible

 

 

understand

'

 

                                                     PHOTOCOP1ABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002

                                                                                Total        !30

TEST 7     Listening

Task 1

Listen to five conversations and decide where they are taking place. Tick the correct boxes in

the table below.                                        (5 points)

Task 2

Listen again and answer the questions. (5 points) What town is the passenger going to visit?

What time does the theatre performance start?


 

 

Conversations

 

1

2

3

4

5

Railway Station

 

 

 

 

 

Lost Property Office

 

 

 

 

 

Airport

 

 

 

 

 

Restaurant

 

 

 

 

 

Box Office

 

 

 

 

 

What is the customer going to drink?

What is the briefcase made of?

What ticket is the passenger buying?


                                                                                                                                   Total        10

TEST 7 Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

Student A                    Student B                                                              ""*

You have found yourself in the following situations.         You have found yourself in the following situations.

Ask your partner for help. Remember to be polite.           Ask your partner for help. Remember to be polite.

Your partner will either agree or refuse to fulfil Your partner will either agree or refuse to fulfil

your requests.               your requests.

1      You have arranged a visit to the dentist's and            1          Your bike is broken and you have promised your

you have nobody to take care of your dog for girlfriend/boyfriend to take him/her on a ride

two hours.                            in the forest this weekend. You don't have

2      Your father has asked you to go to the airport           proper tools and you can't repair the bike.

to collect his friend from Frankfurt who doesn't          2     Your mother has asked you to help her with the

speak English. You don't speak German, but shopping on Saturday. You have promised your

your friend does. Ask him/her to help you. friend to study together for the history test the

same day. Ask your friend to meet another time.

Agree to your partner's first request. Refuse to fulfil

your partner's second request. Agree to your partner's second request. Refuse to

fulfil your partner's first request.

Useful expressions:

Would it be possible .,,?, Could you (possibly) ...?,         Useful expressions:

I wonder if...?, I WQS wondering if... ?, Wilt you Would it be possible ...?, Could you (possibly) ...?,

be ...?, Is it all right if...?, If you'd like to. Do you           I wonder if...?, I was wondering if... ?, Will you

think ...?, I'm afraid, I'd prefer not, etc. be ...?, Is it all right if...?, If you'd like to. Do you

think ...?, I'm afraid, I'd prefer not etc.

                                                                                                                                Total         20

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8 $tob*f &W5

TEST 8      Use of English

.£y Change each statement into indirect, reported speech by using the appropriate verb

from the options provided.                      (10 points)

0      'My daughter will not play truant from school any more.' (denied/promised)

           The          parent         ..^P.^^^^..k^.dm^h^..m.M

&#£&bw. tKftf^.fKQf&Sf&wLAffl. uMffk-.

1      In the beginning, the Beatles perfb'rmeO[ music influenced by American rock'n'roll and rhythmand-blues' (reminded the public/warned)

           The expert                        J!frMrA>..>

,'.,.,.,...„

2      'Butter melts in the heat.' (suggested/explajneti)

           The teacher       J f ^ . u . : . „ < ? ^ ^ * „ <

3      I 'We are not complaining about our working

) conditions' (accused/(Jenjed)          JA They        

4      'We may need to limit financial 6id to a handful

            of students' (refused/admitted^     ..

The school officials 1S^ titf*r#L-. &.

5      The terrorist attacks on the US will result in retaliation and war' (offered/^vajne^)^

The US president..,

V * $ &

*Why haven't they followed the instructions in the manual?1 (claimed/wonderedj « ,. The employer

7        'OK, I will snow you the places worth seeing in our town.' (agreed/insisted) .

           My pen friend     

8        'Tom, you have committed a serious offence.'

(accused/threatened) ^ / / / /, -IxJ The policema^^..,.^...^^.....^

9        'Teenage rebelliousness ty a natural part of growing up.' (promised/suggested), j. ,

           The psychologist                  . C Z . . ^ : d l

M&=3£.

10     'Prices rose dramatically under the previous government.' (insisted/ioquired)          ,,          V

The^iew Prime M^n^ter ±^^Bk i/W^ j^v^>«y L Complete the text below with one word (a verb or a particle) in each gap.       (5 points)

For the first months of our marriage we were very happy although we carried (0) ...*?&.. living with my parents. My wife didn't believe we could ever move out so I decided to (1) &?*$'up the challenge and buy a small flat for us. Even though I had some money put (2) .ffiffifchat to take a bariUpaq. We were also forced to (3) .*:.4™tiown on other expenses, including a holiday trip (4) .jA^TTup months in advance. My wife came (5) .&&.. with still another idea - to sell her grandparents' antiques. But fortunately, we didn't have to do that.

C Complete the definitions using one word in

each gap.                                                (11 points)

0      An event which causes great harm or death natural ..fteAC.

1      The condition in which there are too many people living in one place -

2      A large mass of snow, ice and rocks falling down a mountain - WS$&Z2SiJ&A-/

3      The cutting down of many trees -

4      A large amount of water covering a place which is usually dry - d~*°fe/....

5      A long period of'time with no rain -

6      A sudden violent; movement of the Earth's surface - Jj£)&*fu'

7      A very violent tropical storm or wind in which air circulates rapidly -

8      Bad health which is a result of lack of food or eating unhealthy food 9 The state of being extremely poor -

10     A sudden large fall of earth and rocks down a cliff or the side of a mountain -

11     A serious shortage of food -

        Match words to form compounds.      (4 points)

0          health *. l E global           \ .

2 J destruction

3/^rendangered

4  n exploitation

5  X greenhouse

6  (^.volcanic

7'^renewable

8*2? modernised

J}    species

^by farming eruptions

), programme

e); warming

fl effect

& energy

SaJ of women

"ty of habitats

                                                                               Total             30


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TEST 8      Reading

Why are rainforests important?

Rainforests play an invaluable role in sustaining life on Earth. Extending from the colder climates of Alaska and Chile to the tropics of South America, Africa and Asia, rainforests are a natural home for many of the Earth's plant and animal species. Rainforests also provide homes for an estimated 50 million people around the world, most of whom rely on the rainforest to sustain their traditional ways of life.

Although people often don't realise it, rainforests also play an important role in sustaining life outside the rainforest. For example, at least 25 per cent of all modern drugs originally came from rainforests.

(1 ) Many of the foods we consume today, from rice and millet to bananas and pineapples, owe their origin to the rainforests, and rainforests provide an ongoing source of genetic material that is crucial to the sustained productivity of many modern crops.

Rainforests also perform many 'natural services' for which there is simply no substitute. (2 ) . . Rainforests serve a vital function by absorbing this rain and then slowly releasing it into rivers and streams. Within rainforests, large amounts of water are constantly circulating in cycles that regulate the balance of regional climates. As long as rainforests remain intact, rivers run clear and flow throughout the year. (3 ) This results in soil erosion, floods and droughts, often with devastating consequences.

Old-growth forests are cut for 'development1, agriculture, cattle grazing and plantations, among other reasons. They are targeted by logging companies for wood and by oil companies for drilling. In many countries, rainforests come under pressure from people suffering poverty and desperate for any

land not under the control of local elite.

The estimated 50 million indigenous peoples globally who live in the rainforests have traditional ways of life based on an interdependent relationship with their environments. So rainforest destruction poses a direct threat to the survival of indigenous peoples and their unique cultures. (4 ) Over the last century, more indigenous cultures have

disappeared than ever before. Today, entire peoples and their unique cultures continue to disappear.

Every year the public pays more and more attention' to governments and corporations that destroy

rainforests. All around us there are signs of hope. (5 ) Scientists emphasise the need to protect what remains, politicians are careful not to be


branded as anti-environmental and every year, many countries add new protected areas. None of this was true twenty years ago.

Task 1

Read the text about rainforests and complete the gaps (1-5) with the sentences (A-F). There is one extra sentence you do not need. (5 points)

A     Around the world, indigenous peoples are struggling to defend their rights and protect their rainforest homelands, often in the face of massive corporate or government-led industrial projects.

B     Companies like Home Depot have been forced to stop selling old growth wood products because their customers don't want to buy products from endangered forests.

C    Although tropical forests cover less than 2 per cent of the globe, they provide a home for more

than 50 per cent of all living things—as many as 5 million species of plants, animals and insects.

D    Over 2,000 tropical plants have been identified by scientists as having anti-cancer properties.

E     For example, rainforests cover less than 7 per cent of the Earth's surface, yet they receive almost half of all the rain that falls on land.

F     When rainforests are destroyed, rivers swell and fill with muddy substance after rainfalls, and then

shrink during dry spells.

Task 2

Read again and decide if the statements are true

(T) or false (F).                                           (5 points)

1      In the rainforest areas, there are about

50 million people who have always

           lived there.                                                  T / F

2      Water circulation in the rainforests influences the climates of particular

          regions.                                                       T / F

3      Many companies are no longer interested in obtaining wood and oil from the

          rainforests.                                                  T / F

4      Over the last decades, the situation of the rainforest local communities has

          improved.                                                    T / F

5      Twenty years ago there were more rainforest areas that were protected

          by governments.                                          T / F

                                                                                Total            10:


PHOTQCOPIABLE CQ Pearson Education Ltd 2002                                                   


TEST 8       Writing Task

Write a 200-250 word report about the popularity of practising sports among the students in your

school. Think of useful statistics to present in the positive or negative facts and a few recommendations for the conclusion.

Include the following information: what sports teenagers in your school practise

• how often they do sports when they practise sports the percentage of boys and girls practising sports the number of physical education classes per week

the number of gyms, swimming pools and other sports facilities available in your area costs of practising sports other

Remember to structure your report appropriately.

Include the following:

heading (subject and date)


aim of the report and background information

negative comments and findings positive comments and findings conclusions and recommendations

Useful expressions: according to, also, although, as a result, for example, furthermore, however, in addition, moreover, on the other hand, in this way, to sum up, etc.

                                                                                 Total          20

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TEST D      Use of English

y Read the following dialogue and change it

into indirect, reported speech by using the appropriate reporting verbs from the table. You can use each verb only once. (10 points)

accusecf* admitted ^sketft/ denied^ explained

    inquired promisecnO refusea? reminded*? u r r r i j i - u i v          r i_ r \tj\.\*rf

suqqiggested> warned^ T

TEACHER: HOW is everybody today? Did you all remember to bring in your homework assignment?

MICHAEL: I haven't got mine. My mother came down with malaria yesterday.

TEACHER: You are pulling my leg again, Michael! I won't put up with your miserable excuses any more!

MICHAEL: I'm not lying. You can call the hospital to check.

TEACHER: I won't do it, Michael. Stop wasting everyone's time! Enough is enough! Remember you'll all be sitting the exam next month.

MICHAEL: OK, OK, I'm sorry. I'll bring my homework assignment tomorrow.

p      The teacher asked the class            (^.tffy„t£im.„.

ji

¥

f

/

A

$

B Circle the correct alternative in each

sentence.                                                   (6 points)

Do you enjoy to listen/^stenin^to classical music:

1      You shouldn't put |>ff td} apologise/apojogisTmJi for your misbehaviour any longer.

2      I'm looking forward to visit/vjsjtinj)my in-laws

           in London again.                A

3     


Robert is not used to be^beincj^treated like a baby.

The President offeredQpTook/looking into the matter more closely.

5* It's amazing|os"e^seeing him so calm after 9 sucFa dreadful accident.

6      My grandparents can't stand to watch^atcfiirig, violence in the news.

7      I don't regretto tellgteTlifi]fihim the whole truth - he deserved it.

8      They must be in the other room. I saw them Cofnefcommq to the office a minute ago.

9      Is it worth to send<serTdTnfl him an invitation?

He won't come anyway. 10 I If.^pu Jon't have a bottle-opener, try "• '^cVo^en^d^Snfljt with a Knife.

11        I clearly remember to leave^Teavjncpthe key with you. You must have it somewhere.

12        We stoppedcl3rtak£/taking a better look at the building.

»Cy Read the text and complete the sentences with the correct form of the word in brackets. Answers may be in the negative as well as in the positive.         (11 points)

Local government (0) dkCfafC... (elect) will take place in two months but I still haven't made up my mind who to vote for. The average (1) (politics) in our country is not prepared for the office and most of the time he or she is very

(2) (efficient). The local government

is not usually blamed for a high (3)

(employ) rate, but local officials are considered

(4)                       (sensitive) to people's needs and

(rely). They are almost

(6)                       (access), and once you finally

manage to arrange an appointment with them, they tend to be rude and (7) (help)- Still

they keep complaining about their salaries, claim

they are (8)                       (Pay) ar,d demand more

fringe benefits. Probably some people would

(9)           (agree) with me, but I believe it's better to abstain than to vote for such people. Don't

(10)        (understand) me; I'm not

advocating a boycott of local elections - this would be highly (11) (responsible). I just don't want to vote against my instincts.


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TEST D      Reading

Scotland - Land of the Brave by Bornaby Harward

If you're not afraid of the weather, Scotland can be one of the most beautiful and fascinating of travel destinations. The beautiful landscape and rich history could keep a holidaymaker happy for months. A great

way to see the highlands and islands of Scotland is

by bike. Scottish roads are reasonably free of traffic,

especially if you keep off the main routes, and because if s not a vast country you can see a lot of

it by bike in a couple of weeks.

A friend of mine and I did just that at the age of sixteen, and though it rained for ten out of the

fourteen days we were there, nonetheless we had a marvellous time. But the weather isn't always so bad. We made the mistake of going in August, which is the height of the 'rainy season'. Apparently the weather is generally better in spring and early summer.

The route we cycled along was more or less the same taken by the historic rebel. Prince Charles Edward Stuart, known as Bonnie Prince Charlie when he escaped after his army was defeated by the English at the battle of Culloden in 1746. Thaf s where our journey began. Instead of staying on country people's farms, we lived in campsites or

youth hostels. And instead of deliberately taking a long route across the highlands as Bonnie Prince Charlie had done to avoid capture, we took a pretty straight course along the roads.

We gradually pedalled the length of Loch Ness to the town of Fort William, passing Britain's highest mountain, Ben Nevis, on the way. It's not actually such a high mountain (1,392 m) and we wanted to climb it, but we didn't because it was raining. Most

of our time we had to wear waterproof clothing to keep out the pouring rain.

At Fort William, we turned west and soon came to the charming village of Glenfinnan on the edge of a loch. At some point Bonnie Prince Charlie went to


the Isle of Skye. So, with our bicycles, my friend and I did the same. I don't know what Charlie thought of Skye, but I remember thinking it was rather like a

wet sponge. I had wet shoes for the entire four days I was there. But it really is a beautiful island. The Cuillin Mountains are particularly popular with hikers and climbers.

Since this bicycle tour, I have been back to the highlands of Scotland many times and I look forward

to my next visit. The weather may sound threatening, but it's very suited to the dramatic scenery, and the fog and the mountains together can really set off your imagination. And anyway, the sun does come out sometimes.

(Adapted from The Worid of English)

Task 1

Read the holiday report and sequence the events from the story (A-E) correctly. (5 points)

3 ..

A    Barnaby and his friend went to the town of Fort William.

B    Barnaby and his friend arrived at the village of Glenfinnan on the edge of a lake. C Barnaby and his friend found themselves in Culloden.

D    Barnaby and his friend visited the Isle of Skye.

E    Barnaby and his friend went by Britain's highest mountain, Ben Nevis.

Task 2

Read again and answer the questions,     (5 points)

1      How long did Barnaby and his friend stay in Scotland?

2      What was the weather like?

3      What was their means of transport in Scotland?

4      Where did they stay for the nights?

5      Why didn't they climb Ben Nevis?

                                                                                Total         10


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TEST D     Listening

Task 1

Listen to the short presentation of the Clean Up the World movement and fill in the gaps in the

sentences below.                                      (5 points)

1      Clean Up the World started in

2      The international movement involved people.

3      In the year 2000, there were countries involved in the project.

4      The ninth Clean Up the World campaign took place over the weekend of      .-. 5      Mr Klaus Toepfer is the            of the

United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).

Task 2

Listen again and answer the questions. (5 points)

Where did the Clean Up the World project originate?

When did the international movement begin? How many people were involved in the project in 2000?

What countries joined the Clean Up the World project in 2001?

What organisation joined CUW in 2001 apart from the United Nations Environment Program?

Total [ J id]


TEST D    Speaking

Task


Work with your partner.

Student A

Together with your partner, think of possible solutions to the following problems. Present your point of view and ask your partner for their ideas.

1      Abandoned/homeless animals in the local area.

Is school aid possible?

2      Road security for school children. How can the local authorities help?

Useful expressions:

so that, that's why, basically, because of that one reason, a tot of its to do with, that's the real reason that I mean, and I think, anyway, etc. -*«!

Student B

Together with your partner, think of possible solutions to the following problems. Present your point of view and ask your partner for their ideas.

1      Streets around. Can we keep them clean?

2      New sports centre. Can we organise a campaign to have one built?

Useful expressions:

so that, that's why, basically, because of that one reason, a lot of it's to do with, that's the real reason that, I mean, and I think, anyway, etc.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Total      20

s

                                                                               PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 9      Use of English

A Rewrite each sentence so that it means the same as the sentence before. Use the word/$

from the brackets.                                   (10 points)

0        I think it's the governments duty to do something about unemployment, (should)

The government ..j/wf^.&.JQWatfuxg

,.j^ffl£.tMt&li^yM1&&A

1        I'm very tired. Why don't you clear the table yourself? (rather) I'd

2        In my opinion, they should get down to some serious work right now. (high time) Ifs

3        My elder brother made me stay at home and do some household chores, (demand) My elder brother

4        You should put on your jewellery for such a big occasion, (better) You

5        It is essential that every child should have equal educational opportunities, (insist) The headmaster

6        I think it's a good idea to raise some money for her operation, (were)

If I

7        I think Tom should start studying for his exams,

(about) Ifs

8        Stay in bed for several days and take antibiotics, (ought) You

9        I believe we should widen our relations with the neighbouring countries, (suggest) The Prime Minister

10     Barbara should stop seeing him before it's too late, (had)

         Barbara ,.

B Complete the following sentences with the correct multi-part verb with up. (8 points)

0      Ifs hard to .f)k?P..y$:. smoking without professional help.

1     


Everybody is worried that food prices will again this month.

2      The police had to the traffic for an hour due to a train accident.

3      Could you help me to the room? Ifs very dirty.

4      I don't think it was very wise of you to

late for a job interview.

5      The Smiths will have to their old house. Ifs in a terrible state.

6      I'm sure Jill will when you tell her she has scored two more points than she

expected.

7      We asked the local authorities for more money to a special school for gifted children.

8      Don't worry, she won't know the truth. I will a convincing excuse.

^ Match the words from two columns to form

compound words.                                     (3 points)

0           golden ^            a) punishment

1           drug      \ .         b) crime

2           death    ^ \         c)         dealing 3           capital   ^ d )      age

4      life            e) changes

5      dramatic   f)          sentence

6      violent      g) penalty

& Complete the sentences with appropriate words. Use only one word in each gap. (9 points) 0 The leader of our party spoke against racial /fe#tw##u&«.

1      Although a lot of measures are taken to combat it, crime is still on the

2      Ancient Greece was the     of

Western European culture.

3      He was found guilty of after they had caught him breaking into his neighbour's house and stealing a CD recorder.

4      The educational system in our country is

          currently in a                              of transition.

5      In my city many people live in the streets and the problem of is growing.

6      The twentieth century saw the of terrorism in its cruellest form. 7 I have no idea what we'll eventually do. Our now.

8

9


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TEST 9     Listening

Task 1

Listen to two girls making plans for a day around London and decide what the things below refer

to.                                                             (5 points)

1      The Guinness World of Records is

a)   a book.

b)   a museum.

c)   a pub.

2      The Wallace Collection is

a)   a collection of books.

b)   a modern clothes shop.

c)   an art gallery.

3      St Martin in the Fields is

a)   a church.

b)   a gallery.

c)   a concert hall.

4      Charing Cross is

a)   a railway Line.

b)   a chapel.

c)   an underground station.

5      Baradero is

a)   a restaurant.

b)   a kind of wine.

c)   a name of a dock.

Task 2

Listen again and answer the questions. (5 points)

1      How long is the tour of London going to take?

2      What would Ann like to start the day with?

3     


Where is St Martin in the Fields?

4      Where do the girls plan to travel to have lunch?

5      What time do the girls arrange to meet?


                                                                                                                        Total        10

TEST 9 Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

Student A             Student B                                                             -*«

Read the following problems. Think of the possible         Read the following problems. Think of the possible

reasons why such problems have occurred and make a reasons why such problems have occurred and make a

few suggestions as to how to improve them. Talk to        few suggestions as to how to improve them. Talk to

your partner and find out about their opinion.      your partner and find out about their opinion.

1      Your school needs money for new sports      1          First-year students find it difficult to assimilate

equipment.                    into the school atmosphere.

2      The local library isn't as popular as it used to             2          The local park is dirty and is no longer a place

be.                                for recreation.

Useful expressions: Useful expressions:

Let's, How about, I'd change. Why don't they/we ...?, Let's, How about, I'd change. Why don't they/we .„?,

What would be great/good is, I wish they'd,         What would be great/good is, I wish they'd,

they/we ought to. It's about time, ltd be a good    they/we ought to. It's about time, Ifd be a good

idea if, It'd be better to. What we need.   idea if, ltd be better to. What we need.

There could be. What about, etc. There could be. What about, etc

                                                                                                                      Total         20

                                        PHOTOCQP1ABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 10        Use of English

A Using the beginnings provided, rewrite each sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the

first sentence.                                                              (10 points)

0      I've ordered oxtail soup, not mutton broth. it      ,.h.p^^jp}^.fhs^J!^Md^?^t.M^.

...##*^&jfe#k

1        It was the most stirring patriotic song I have ever heard. Never

2        I just need a bit of your guidance to carry on with the project. All

3        She wouldn't have applied for this job if she had known what the conditions were like.

Had

4        Barbara hardly ever speaks up in front of many people. Seldom

5        My mother disapproves of our engagement, not my father. It

6        The teacher didn't only scold them in class, but she also called their parents to school.

Not only

7        Young people trying to jump queues really annoy me.

What

8        The President decided to send his troops there only when the peace talks failed.

It

9        I don't like my hair dyed. I will not have it permed either.

I don't like my hair dyed, and neither

10      The dean started his lecture and immediately heard a strange noise outside the hall.

No sooner

B             Complete the text below with one word

(a verb or a particle) in each gap.                            (10 points)


RUTH: It all started when my twin sister Ann learned that she was two minutes older than me. She began to (0) hfffk down on me and do terrible things I cannot (1) up with any more. Many times she's gone

(2) with my best dress without

asking for permission. Ann is also very critical

              and keeps getting (3)                             me for one

thing or another. She doesn't realise that it really (4) to me and I might go (5) her very soon. Or I'll (6) my own back on her by wearing her best clothes.

ANN: I have no idea why Ruth kicks (7)

a fuss every time I borrow something from her.

             I always (8)                              it back when I don't

need it any more. Besides, I'm her elder sister.

MUM: I think I need to talk it (9) with the girls. Hopefully they'll be able to

(10) forward some kind of solution.

They can't go on like that any longer.

C              Match the words from two columns to form

meaningful expressions.

(3 points)

inquire about something chat in somebody's ear

mention all day with a backpack stroll about the times of

whisper

stagger trudge

trains

e) along the beach n her concern

g) half-awake into the

bathroom

iPy Complete the sentences with appropriate words. Use only one word in each gap. (7 points)

0      The boys had a violent cmjiimmt. over their toy soldiers.

1      The talks aim at ending a 20-year-old

between the two families.

2      You keep trying to earn more and more money, even though you have plenty already. It's just

There are many countries nowadays that are divided by religious or racial My little brother is very brave - he shows no signs of

Unfortunately, the strike ended in violent

with the police.

He was eaten up with when he saw his wife talking to another man.

My mother longed for the         of conflict between my father and me.


Total I "T30


PHOTOCOPIABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 2002


TEST 10       Reading

Growing up with brothers and sisters

Probably nothing upsets parents more on a daily basis than constant fighting between children. If you

can accept the fact that fighting between sisters and brothers is a normal part of growth, you will find it easier to deal with your children's fighting. It takes

children years to learn some of the basic lessons in human relationships, and this includes getting along with sisters and brothers.

Some degree of rivalry and conflict among sisters and brothers is to be expected. There is no reason why your firstborn child should welcome a new baby without some jealousy. Who would want to give up being the centre of the universe?

There are natural reasons for fighting between sisters and brothers: they are often different sexes; they're almost always different ages, and they have different temperaments. They don't choose each other, yet they have to share the one or two people

they want most for themselves. So there will always

be some competition, as children look for their parents' attention and try to prove one way or

another that they are the 'best'. Sometimes a child may be jealous because of what a sibling received or

was allowed to do. Children's personalities don't always match perfectly. Conflict can also result from the ordinary teasing that children do.

Two problem areas for parents related to sibling rivalry are fairness and fighting. One of the dangers parents face is the notion that they should be 'fair'. But if they treat all their children alike, they are unfair to all of them, for they are not all alike. What

is 'fair' for one child may be improper for another. It is not equality that children desire, but to be

recognised as individuals.

Most parents feel deep concern about the endless fighting that goes on among brothers and sisters. They love each child, and it hurts to see them fight or hurt each other. A great deal of child-raising energy goes into settling fights and trying to 'teach' children to get along.

Difficult as it may be, it is best to do as little as possible. Here's why:

-    If the children work it out by themselves, they will probably learn more and suffer less than if

you step in.

-    If you step in, it usually means blaming one or the other - most often the older one. Blaming can cause a chain reaction: guilty feelings, feelings of

AM                                                                    PHOTOCOPIABLE ©

being unable to deal with the situation, anger,

quarrelling, more fighting, more guilt, and so on.

-    If they know you really won't step in, they can usually find a solution themselves.

You can try to reduce fighting between sisters and brothers in a few ways. For example, you may try to spend some time alone with each child doing

something that the child really enjoys. Also, praise children for what they are, not just for what they can do, and resist the temptation to motivate your children by comparing them to each other or to other children as this may lead to competitiveness. Above all, let your children know that you love them equally, though each in a different way. Emphasise family unity. If your children say bad things about one another to you, point out that no matter how

unpleasant their behaviour may be, the sister or brother is still and will always be 'one of us'. When we remind our children that they will always belong

to us and to each other, we strengthen their sense of safety. This inner security enhances their capacity for brotherly and sisterly love.

Task 1

Read the article about sibling rivalry and circle the correct answer, a)r b) or c). (4 points)

1      What parents find irritating is

a)   their children having different temperaments.

b)   their children's fighting.

c)   their children's attempts to prove that they

are the best.

2      Parents find it difficult to

a)   be fair to their children.

b)   strengthen their children's sense of safety.

c)   find solutions to their children's problems.

3      Children are jealous of

a)   being older or younger than their siblings.

b)   being recognised as individuals.

c)   things their brothers or sisters were allowed to do.

4      If parents don't interfere with their children's fights, the children

a)   may learn to work out the problems themselves.

b)   may never learn to solve their problems.

c)   may blame one another more.

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Task 2

Read again and decide if the statements are true (T) or false (F) or if there is no information (Nl).

(6 points)

1      Learning to get along with sisters and brothers is a normal part of

           growth.                                                T / F / NI

2      One of the reasons for sibling rivalry

           is age difference.                                  T / F / NI

3      The best way of solving problems between children is to treat them

          exactly the same.                                  T / F / NI

4      Many conflicts between siblings can be solved by grandparents. T / F / NI

5      Praising children for what they are does not help to reduce sibling

           rivalry.                                                  T / F / NI

6      Each child is entitled to certain possessions that should not have to

be shared with anyone.                  T / F / NI Total   10

TEST 10     Writing


Task

You have returned from a trip to Greece organised by SUNSET TRIPS LTD. You are not satisfied with the accommodation and the hotel

facilities you were offered in Chalkidiki. Write a letter of complaint to SUNSET TRIPS LTD about the holiday. Your letter may consist of 120-150 words. Do not exceed the word limit.

In your letter include the following information:

what you didn't like about the hotel

how the inconvenience influenced your stay in Chalkidiki what you'd like as compensation for the inconvenience

Remember to structure your letter appropriately.

Include the following:

your address and the date the company's name and address a greeting

your reason for writing and specific information

about the service the reasons for the complaint

your demands and expected further action to be taken by the company

a formal endinq a signing off

                                                                               Total         20


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TEST E     Use of English

A, There are mistakes in seven out of these ten sentences. Find them and re-write the sentences

correctly.                                                (10 points)

0 Never she will tell you the whole truth about the accident.

Afe^T. wUi. f.(l&. ife&Jftttft tkk wfa&l&MtiMu.

....d?pM.tfa.#mdt*t£*

00    All I want from you is a little bit of understanding and patience.

carr&ct..

1      Tom wouldn't be so rich now, had he not won the tennis tournament in 1998.

2      One of the reporters suggested to wait for the royal newlyweds in front of the church.

3      Not only didn't he apologise to his fiancee, but he also bought her flowers.

4      The new managing director insisted that our company invest in new equipment.

5      It is because of the attractive price they bought this flat, not because of the location.

6      Hardly ever does she come to visit her elderly mother in an old people's home.

7      What really annoys me are people who can't stop boasting about themselves.

B Read the text and put the verbs in brackets

in the correct form.                                   (7 points)


I'm bitterly disappointed with your school results. You should (0) si#tf£. (start) thinking about your future seriously. If s high time you

(1):                         (give up) most of your

extracurricular activities. If I were you, I

(2)                          (devote) more time to studying

instead of playing football all day long. Also, you ought (3) (consider) what kind of

studies you'd like to pursue in the future. I suggest

that you (4) (write) to some colleges for more information about courses they offer. No, when I come to think of it, you'd better

(5)                                  (visit) some of them in person

and talk to admission officers. And I'd rather you

(6)                                  (not postpone) it until May.

There will be crowds of people trying to get in. And remember, this is our last conversation about it. It's

about time you (7) (take) responsibility for your own life!

X> Rewrite the sentences, replacing the underlined words with the correct multi-part verb formed from one of the verbs given

in the box.                                               (10 points)

brighten do get give hold kick make jjictT put set talk

Could you collect the letter from the post office on your way home?

.... c^^^^v^w^/^^'- -<^»r ^usc .^&t3fce^r;yfra**t< JC^& ...p6st0ffij&.6&.yQux.my..keim£<?.. The terrifying story really affected her and so she burst into tears.


Sorry to be late, but we were delayed on the

8 No sooner had he seen me fighting with a tall

road for two hours by a traffic accident.

 

guy when he decided to come to the rescue.

9

I am not fond of classical music, neither I like rock and roll.

There was not enough money in the local budget to renovate the building after the fire.

10

My parents demanded me to break off my

Every argument I suggested for consideration at the meeting was rejected.

relationship with George.

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5        The fight lasted for almost two months as neither side wanted to surrender.

6        They all tried to make her more cheerful, but nothing seemed to work.

7        Robert was not sure what to do and decided to discuss the offer with his family.

8        A lot of efforts are being made to prepare a new art exhibition in the National Gallery.

9        I didn't remember the ending of the story so I

invented it as I went along.

10     Why are you making a fuss about it? It was not my intention to hurt you.

D Complete the text choosing the correct

alternatives.                                              (3 points)

(0)           However/^tthougfTyPespite many people in my country claim they are against the principle of an eye for an eye, they don't want capital

(1)           penalty/sentence/punishment to be abolished. Some of them (2) say/speak/tell that even minor offences should be punished more severely. For example, a person charged with


(3) burglary/'shoplifting/'theft - 'a crime of breaking into a building and stealing things' - should get a much (4) larger/harder/more serious sentence. Young people involved in violent (5) feuds/chshes/rows

with police during demonstrations should be treated in the same way. These actions may prevent firsttime offenders from committing crimes.

Unfortunately our legal system is in a

(6) burst/condition/state of flux at the moment and nobody knows in which direction it will go.

E Complete the sentences with appropriate words. Use only one word in each gap. (10 points)

0      He was completely exhausted, but somehow he managed to ....'_..i£A$Afi£ to the finish.

1      After being the target of terrorist attacks, Israel wanted to take its enemies.

2      Soldiers were trained to     in step.

3      Two students from our school have been caught selling drugs and will be charged with drug

The teacher wanted me to be quiet so I tried to the news in Tina's ear.

The number of our employees will probably

from 300 to about 160.

After the match, the rival of football fans started fighting. There are more and more homeless people on

          the streets who                           for food or

A   sentence would be the right punishment for these murderers. Over 20 per cent of people in this region live in

Their income is less than is needed to buy food and pay their rent.

10 Due to some new factories opening up here recently, unemployment in this city is on the

 

40

TotaL 


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TEST E Writing

Task

Write a discursive essay on one of the statements below, Think of arguments for and against and reasons backing them up. Your work may consist of 200-250 words. Do not exceed the word limit.

A          The only way to protect the Earth against ecological threats is to stop technological developments,

B           The use of animals in medical research is indispensable in finding new cures.

C           To 'be 'or to 'have': what are young people really interested in nowadays?

D          Do public figures have the right to privacy?

Remember to structure your work appropriately; Include the following:

the topic of your essay

background information about the situation possible reasons for the situation a list of arguments 'for* with examples and facts where possible (to express the attitudes and reasons to support your point of view) a list of arguments 'againsf with examples and


facts where possible (to express the attitudes and reasons to support your point of view) a conclusion and your own personal opinion about the topic

Useful linking expressions:

one of the main reasons, on the other hand, in

addition, moreover, consequently, so, due to, so much, just because, so that, despite t/ie fact that, as a result of, because, in order to, in the same way as, in conclusion, etc.

                                                                                Total     rWj

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TEST E        Reading

America is work: 'Whistle while you work' by Ethan Allen

(1        ) Whafs it like to live in America? 'America, the Beautiful.' Land of the free. Land of the brave.

Land of rock stars and movie stars. Brooks, Madonna, Springsteen, Elvis. Authors Mark Twain, James

Baldwin and Toni Morrison. Martin Luther King, Harry Truman, Abe Lincoln. History. The Civil War. The hippy movement of the 1960s. War veterans. The Grand Canyon. The urban cowboy and the real cowboys. Las Vegas. Manhattan Island. Hollywood. Sure, these are images of America. But ask the other 99 per cent of America what ifs like to live in America. You'll get a very different picture.

(2       ) So, what one short sentence describes the real America? How about this one? America is work. Work. The pride of a nation that gets so many philosophers thinking hard trying to figure out why America works so well. Proud of his (and my) nation, Abraham Lincoln said: 'America is the last and best hope of earth.' He said that because he knew that people in America were committed to the task of

finding a safe passage for free prosperous people.

(3       ) America is work. Careers. Being proud and happy about what you do every day. It's the smiling, intense, goal-oriented celebration of life. Ifs moms and dads working. Ifs kids off to school. Students know they have to do more than just study to work in the profession of their talent and choice. Some read 500 pages a week. They write research papers and learn public speaking. They support their hometown baseball, football and basketball teams. But students also have to learn how to earn a living, working as machinists, electricians, plumbers, carpenters, cooks, customer service specialists, business owners, managers, nurses, doctors etc. Everyone must produce quality goods everywhere day and night. It all takes work. Quality. That means America has maintained a high employment rate of over 93 per cent since World War II.

(4       ) I hear America described in terms of the 'spaghetti westerns' Those old movies tell the story that life in early America was tough. No matter what colour hat you wore, you were working to make a living anyway you could. Sure, the bad men went to jail so the good men could have a safe life, for their families. That tradition of freedom means Americans work to be autonomous.

(5      


 ) It works because people vote for their government representatives. It is not perfect but still, a working America ensures government is 'of the people, by the people, and for the people'.

Elected officials work for the people, not the other way around. Yes, there are a lot of laws and rules in America that are a modern-day law of society and

nature. Americans do not want to depend on

government. That is what makes America work. This 'working to win' spirit is the American way.

(Adapted from The World of English)

Task 1

Read the text and decide which of the paragraphs (1-5) is best characterised

by the summaries (A-E).                             (5 points)

Paragraph 1

Paragraph 2 Paragraph 3 Paragraph 4

Paragraph 5

A    The country with a past

B    The country of democracy and success

C    The country of famous people, places and events The country proud of its people's commitment The country of hard-working citizens of all ages and professions

Task 2

Read again and circle the correct answer,

a), b) or c).                                                (5 points)

1      To what is America compared?

a)   country of entertainers

b)   country of courageous people

c)   country of philosophers

2      Who believed America is the country of hope?

a)   Abraham Lincoln

b)   Bruce Springsteen

c)   Mark Twain

3      What do most students do apart from studying?

a)   Learn public speaking

b)   read 500 pages a week

c)   work towards their future professions

4      What was life like in America according to old westerns?

a)   autonomous

b)   difficult

c)   safe

5      What actually makes America work?

a)   its state laws and rules

b)   its elected officials

c)   its independent society

Total


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TEST E      Listening

Task 1

Listen to five accounts of the terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington

DC. Match the speakers with the moods and

feelings.

(5 points)

1      Yvonne

2      Matt

3      Paul

4      Trevor

5      Elizabeth

A     We felt helpless.

B     I'm worried about my family in Washington DC.

C     I can't believe people are so calm here.

D     I was horrified by the news of a terrorist attack.

E     I burst into tears when I saw the aircraft explode in the air.

Task 2

Listen again and decide who said the sentences below: Yvonne, Matt, Paul, Trevor or Elizabeth.

(5 points)

1 I work in New York, but I'm not American.

I find it hard to watch TV as all my loved ones live in Washington DC. As I was sitting down at my desk I saw a plane crash into

the second tower. „

4 The first thing I did was to call my boyfriend. I was on my way to Washington from nearby Virginia when I saw the plane on fire.



                                                                                                                                                                                                   Total        10

TEST E      Speaking

Task

Work with your partner.

 

Student A

You have a few complaints about your partner's behaviour. Talk to him/her about them. Take the

suggested roles and try criticising, contradicting, refusing, suggesting and threatening if necessary.

1      Parent to child: You always leave your dirty clothes on your bed.

2      Girlfriend to boyfriend: You don't care about me the way you did before.

Useful expressions:

Just stop, I wish you wouldn't Why don't you ...?, Why do you always ...?, I don't see why ..., if you do that. Why should I...?, If you don't I'll, you never, etc.

Student B                                                            -K

You have a few complaints about your partner's behaviour. Talk to him/her about them. Take the

suggested roles and try criticising, contradicting, refusing, suggesting and threatening if necessary.

1      Friend to friend: You never come on time.

2      Wife to husband: You never help me with the housework.

Useful expressions:

Just stop, I wish you wouldn't Why don't you ...?, Why do you always ... ?, I don't see why ..., if you do that Why should I...?, If you don't, I'll, you never, etc.

                                                                                                                                                                                                  Total        20

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TAPESCRIPTS

TEST 1 - LISTENING

Interviewer: Today in our weekly programme 'Identities' we are talking about stereotypes. A stereotype can be

defined as a fixed idea or image of what a particular type of person or thing is like. Our guest today is Adam Dalton, an Englishman from London. Welcome. Adam. What, Adam, do you think is the nature of stereotypes? Are they simply examples of prejudice or

do they represent social trends and cultural traditions? Adam Dalton: Hello, everybody. Most people would tell you that they never stereotype others, but that begs the question of where these stereotypes come from and how they continue to be used. Perhaps people stereotype others unconsciously, often believing that there is some historical or cultural truth to stereotypes.

Interviewer: Do you rely on stereotypes?

Adam Dalton: Yes, I use stereotypes and, despite the fact I know I do it. I can't seem to stop it. For example, as

soon as I hear another Brit, I will unconsciously try to work out the geographical region of his or her origin,

consider the economic strength and industry of the region, make a guess about the quality of the education system of the region, make a prediction about the individual's job and what Iheir social class is.

Interviewer: And that's just from hearing a certain accent! Adam Dalton: Yes, it's prejudiced, but it's also instinctive and, perhaps more importantly, useful. You do it unconsciously to avoid offence and conllict. It's just your survival instinct and we humans all do it!

Interviewer: There are dangers to this unconscious slereotyping of course.

Adam Dalton: Thai's true. The stereotype you use may only mislead you and disrupt the communication. But your ability to stereotype improves with time - as long as you're not too slow a learner.

Interviewer: There are negative trends in stereotyping, but there are also some positive ones. Do you think Brits are reserved or distant? Do you consider such traits negative?

Adam Dalton: I know many Brits who ate proud of such a trait. However, perhaps Brazilians, being more dynamic and outspoken, would consider such a trait negative. Are we Brits funny . .. funnier than other

cultures? The Brits certainly have a strong tradition in comedy. Is it possible to be funny and outgoing but still reserved?

Interviewer: When you really look at it, stereotypes can be more confusing than useful. They are certainly more limiting than freeing. They can even be dangerous. So why do we use them? Can't we overcome our instincts?

Adam Dalton: There must be other reasons for using stereotypes than just primitive instincts. Perhaps it's laziness: after all, stereotypes give us a simpUfied picture of the world. Some industries, like advertising,

rely on stereotypes - they use them to sell products. I suppose stereotyping is a pan of the struggle between different cultures. But let's hope that there will be fewer victims and fewer negative stereotypes in the future.

Interviewer: Adam Dalton, thank you.

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TEST A - LISTENING

Interviewer: Good morning, listeners. We have with us today Dr William Fry, a psychiatrist and humour researcher who studies the healing effects of humour. Dr Fry, could you explain why it is good to laugh?

Dr Fry: Good morning. The scientific world has examined humour and has found that the laughter associated with happiness has an effect on most of the major

physiologic systems (that is, the normal functions) of the body. These effects have been demonstrated by lab experimentation. It's my personal belief (hat laughter associated with happiness is a total body activity.

Interviewer: Are the benefits of laughter any different for people of different ages?

Dr Fry: The benefits don't seem to be significantly different among adults of various ages, but studies have not been done on children.

Interviewer: Could you explain the physiological opposition between humour and stress?

Dr Fry: The interaction between humour and stress is complicated because stress itself is complicated. Some stress is desirable in human beings to maintain their health — even their survival. We cannot live without some environmental demands on our physical beings. If humour were to eliminate those demands, the human race would die.

Interviewer: Do they teach courses in humour for medical health professionals?

Dr Fry: Doctors have a difficult time using humour with patients because they don't want the patient to think they're fooling around. A doctor is a serious person in

the patient's lite. But it is very valuable for a doctor to be friendly and light-hearted and to show humour from

time to time. In other words, doctors need to strike a balance between being professional and being a

friendly human being.

Interviewer: What are 'humour facilities'? How can one start one in a hospital?

Dr Fry: There are many humour facilities that are presently available in hospitals in the US, Canada, Britain and in other countries. In the US, facilities can include humour

rooms, humour wagons (where a wagon is wheeled

from room to room with humour items available), humour TV channels, clowns (some are actually on hospital staffs), and humour facility visitors who provide programmes to patients on a scheduled basis.

Interviewer: That sounds interesting. What about other situations? How can humour help in, for example, bad traffic, when you're stuck in the car?

Dr Fry: Here's a good idea: with your doors locked, put a red nose on and look around at the people stuck alongside you. Someday, everyone will have a red nose

on and a traffic jam will result in the instant appearance of 10,000 clowns!

Interviewer: How about while studying for exams? It's so easy to get stressed then.

Dr Fry: Having a laugh while you're studying is a good idea because it increases the brain's alertness. You can count on your mind being more alert and you arc less likely to fall asleep while sludying.

Education Ltd 2002


Interviewer: Dr Fry, thank you again for being with us here today.

Interview date: August, 1998

TEST 3 - LISTENING

Lecturer: Good morning, everyone. Today 1 will talk to you about different learning styles and how to adopt them. So. what are learning styles? Well, they are simply different approaches to or ways of learning. There are three major learning styles. We can differentiate between visual, aural or auditory and tactile learners: visual learners learn through seeing;

aural or auditory learners learn through listening, and tactile learners learn through moving, doing and

touching. Now let me describe the qualities of each of these types.

As 1 just mentioned, visual learners are those who learn through seeing. These learners need to see the

teacher's body language and facial expressions to fully understand the content of a lesson. They tend to prefer silting at the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions (e.g. people's heads). They may think in pictures and learn best from visual displays, including diagrams, illustrated text books, overhead transparencies, videos, charts and hand-outs. During a lecture or classroom discussion, visual learners often

prefer to take detailed notes to absorb the information.

Auditory learners learn through listening. They learn best through verbal lectures, discussions, talking things through and listening to what others have to say. Auditory learners interpret the underlying meanings of speech through listening to Ihe tone of voice, pitch, speed and other nuances. Written information may have little meaning until it is heard. These learners often benefit from reading text aloud and using a tape

recorder.

Finally, there are tactile learners. They learn through touching, moving and doing. Tactile persons learn best through actively exploring the physical world around

them. They may find it hard to sit still for long periods and may become distracted by their need for activity and exploration.

You may wonder then how you can make your learning style work for you. It's not difficult, lb help you cope with your learning, it is important to identify your learning style. Once you have figured out the way you learn, you will need to use specific strategies to fit into your way of learning. Let me briefly talk about

some more practical suggestions pertaining to each learning style.

For example, if you are a visual learner, you could use a highlighter when reading a text book. The bright

colour would appeal to your artistic sense and help you Concentrate on the reading. You could also use visual materials such as pictures, charts, maps, graphs, etc., use multi-media (e.g. computers, videos and filmstrips)

or read illustrated books. In the classroom, it is a good idea to have a clear view of your teachers when they are speaking so you can see their body language and facial expression and take notes or ask your teacher to

provide hand-outs. While studying, 1 advise you to illustrate your ideas as a picture before writing them down, visualise information as a picture to aid memorisation and finally study in a quiet place away

from noise.

Auditory learners should participate in class discussions/debates, make speeches and presentations, use a tape recorder during lectures instead of taking notes and read text out aloud. To help memorise things

they could create musical jingles, A good idea would be to discuss their ideas and use analogies and story telling to demonstrate their point.

If you are a tactile type of learner, you should move around to leam new things (e.g. read while on an exercise bike) and work at a standing position. While studying, you should take frequent breaks, but if you wish you could listen to music or chew gum. It would be a good thing to dress up your work space with posters.

TEST B - LISTENING

Interviewer: What do you think about the film The Princess Diaries'!

Woman: My friend and I saw this movie today at the Riverside Mall. 1 have wanted to see this movie ever since 1 saw a preview for it back in July. I am glad I saw it. I was certainly not disappointed.

Interviewer: What did you like about it?

Woman: I loved the storyline. I have always loved childhood tales about ugly ducklings that turn into swans. I could relate completely to this character. Also, the comedy in this movie kept it light and enjoyable to

watch.

Interviewer: Was there anything you found irritating or disaprx>inting?

Woman: Well, the film was very predictable. It was very easy to tell what was going to happen next. I think if it hadn't had so much comedy in it, it would have been boring to watch. I also think that they could cut about 30 minutes out of the movie. There were a few scenes I found boring and I wished they would end. I also

didn't care for the soundtrack. It just isn't the type of music that I like. I think the music was more for the younger generation.

Interviewer: Would you recommend the film?

Woman: Yes, 1 would, although it is geared more towards females. I also saw a lot of teenagers there today at the

cinema, and I would recommend this movie to people ages 13 and over.

Interviewer: Thank you. And what's your opinion on the film The Princess Diaries?

Man: First, let me say that I'm a single middle-aged man. However, 1 have always found Julie Andrews to be a talented actress. Plus. I was in the mood to see something a bit light-hearted one evening.

Interviewer: I see. So did you like the film?

Man: The movie was not that original, but it was somewhat enjoyable. Anne Hathaway was OK in the film, but she reminded me of a junior version of Julia Roberts. Besides, there were absolutely no surprises in the film. But it did keep moving along although it could have been about 15 minutes shorter.

Interviewer: What was good about the movie then?


                                                               PH0T0C0P1ABLE © Pearson Education Ltd 200?


Man: Well, there were some good performances given byAnne Hathaway and Julie Andrews. The movie also made me suspend my sense of reality. I did forget the name of the magical country where Queen Julie ruled. (I think it was some place between Spain and Portugal.) But somehow when I watched the movie, I believed this was a magical little country like the Scottish town of Brigadoon where everything was always* wonderful.

Interviewer: Were there any drawbacks you'd like to mention?

Man: Then- was a bit too much rock and roll in the movie.

Also, the supporting characters were too predictable. With the exception of the neighbour, there was no one who was three-dimensional or with a distinctive personality. As far as the plot goes -1 knew within the first IS minutes what the outcome would be. Although the charm of the performances compensated for the story, a bit more could have been done to improve the film. 1 think some 'bad' characters could have added more tension, but the movie never took that route.

Interviewer: Thank you very much.

TEST 5 - LISTENING

Customer: Hello, I'm looking for a toy for my friend's child.

Shop assistant: Good afternoon. Is the child a boy or a girl?

Customer: A girl. I want to get her something brand new and original. She's got everything you can imagine.

Shop assistant: I Ihink I've got something that would make her happy. It's just up to you to decide. You can choose a dog or a cat

Customer: Another sweet thing, eh?

Shop assistant: Not exactly. What I'm referring to is the last word in Japanese toy fashion. The robot toy.

Customer: Could I have a look at it?

Shop assistant: Sure. Let's have a look at this description here on the package for this toy. It says, 'Poo-Chi is our dog. He sits. He sings. He even dances on his

tiptoes. And he won't chew up the couch. He is a smart

puppy. His sensors make him react to light, sound and toueh. Three separate motors give him the ability to do all the doggie basics - tail wagging, ear flapping and stretching. The more you play with him, the more he does. Ignore him and he'll give you unhappy looks with expressive eyes, which also can show love4

confusion and happiness. Feed him with the included bone and he'll sing up to six different songs. Poo-Chi also speaks to and interacts with other Poo-Chis. He is

5 inches high, 6.5 inches long and he costs S29.99.'

Customer: Well. I admit I'm impressed.

Shop assistant: Or how about our cat, Meow-Chi. As the description on the package says. 'She's a totally

interactive toy cat with a moving head, ears, legs and mouth. Meow-Chi meows, sings, stands, sits, wiggles

her ears, moves her paws and even dances on her tiptoes! Meow-Chi senses light, sounds and your special touch! Her animated eyes show emotion from happiness to sadness to love. Meow-Chi loves to be cared for and the more you take care of her, the happier Meow-Chi will be! Meow-Chi loves playing with her play mouse and responds with happy eyes and wiggling ears! She can speak, sing eight different songs and interact with other Robo-Chi animals! Meow-Chi stands 5 inches high and 6.5 inches long and she also costs $29.99.'

Customer: Oh, dear. 1 really don't know which one to choose. 1-ct me have a walk around the shop and I'll

think it over. I'll be back in a few minutes.

TEST C - LISTENING

An inventor is someone who is die first person to make or use a new kind of machine, game, method or device. In

olher words, he or she puts materials together to make something that didn't exist before. It is not uncommon for English learners to confuse the word invention with the word discovery. But a discovery is different from an invention: it means uncovering something which has been (here, but lias never before been observed.

This time we are going to take a closer look at some important inventions and find out just how they came into existence.

Did you know that...

In 1893, a Chicago citizen by the name of Whitcomb Judson was tired of constantly lacing and unlacing his shoes. He thought it would be a good idea to come up with

a quicker and easier way of fastening them. He designed a special device made up of locking metal teeth, which he used in his shoes. In this way he created the world's first zipper (or 'zip*, as it's called in Britain). Later, zippers were used in many other items.

By coincidence, eyeglasses were invented at the same time in Italy and China in the thirteenth century.

Unfortunately, we don't know the names of these inveniors. In the Middle Ages, glasses were worn primarily as ornaments.

The wristwatch. like many other inventions, came into existence by accident. A woman sitting in a park tied a

small portable clock to her wrist, freeing both hands to care for her child. A Swiss clock-maker saw this and constructed a wristwatch. This happened around 1790, but it wasn't

until a hundred years later that wristwalches became popular.

Paper was invented in the year 105 by a man called Ts'ai Lun. After various experiments, he created a completely new writing material from old fishnets, rags and bamboo wood. This material was paper. The Chinese guarded the secret of paper-making for a very long time. Six centuries later, the Arabs managed to capture some Chinese soldiers who knew the secret formula. The Arabs brought paper to Spain and in time it spread around Europe.

Ice cream existed centuries before anybody had heard of refrigerators and freezers. Roman emperors had snow brought to their palaces from the nearby mountains, and added honey and fruit juices to form an iced dessert. Real ice cream made with cream was invented in Italy in the

fifteenth century. The ice-cream cone was invented in 1904 in America. Before that, ice cream was eaten in the form of

a sandwich between two pieces of water.


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TEST 7 - LISTENING

Conversation 1

Customs Officer: May I sec your passport, please? Passenger: Certainly. Here you are.

Customs Officer: How long are you going lo stay in Britain?

Passenger: About two weeks.

Customs Officer: And you'll be slaying with ...

Passenger: I've got a hotel reservation. It's the Regent Hotel. 41 Regent Street, Cambridge.

Customs Officer: Right. Have you got anything to declare?

Passenger: No, I haven't.

Customs Officer: That's all. Thank you. Knjoy your stay. Passenger: Thank you, sir. Good bye.

Conversation 2

Box Office Clerk: Hello, how can I help you?

Customer: I'd like two tickets for The Pearl Fishers at the London Coliseum, please.

Box Office Clerk: Which performance?

Customer: On Thursday, 25 January.

Box Office Clerk: That's at 7.30 p.m.

Customer: That's right.

Box Office Clerk: It's Balcony B, scats 32-33.

Customer: How much it is?

Box Office Clerk: 10 pounds. Customer: Here you are.

Conversation 3

Waiter: Are you ready to order now, madam?

Customer: Yes, I'd like one cheese lortellini in mushroom soup, and chicken and egg noodles.

Waiter: Anything to drink?

Customer: Just fizzy water.

Waiter: And for dessert?

Customer: What's the ice-cream sundae?

Waiter: It's vanilla ice cream, with a choeolate syrup and whipped lopping.

Customer: I'll have thaL too.

Waiter: OK. It'll be ready in a few minutes, madam. Thank you.

Customer: Thanks.

Conversation 4

Lost Property Attendant: Good afternoon, sir. Can I help you?

Customer: Yes, I'm looking for my briefcase. I left it here, at the station. Perhaps someone has taken it by mistake.

Lost Property Attendant: What does it look like?

Customer: It's a black leather briefcase with a .silver handle.

Lost Property Attendant: Was it labelled?

Customer: Yes. it had my name and address on it.

Lost Property Attendant: So, what's your name, sir?

Customer: I'm Gordon Fergusson.

Lost Property Attendant: Gordon Fergusson? Just a

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moment. I^et me see. I think I can help you. Is this yours?

Customer: Yes, that's my briefcase. Thank you very much. How much do I owe you?

Lost Property Attendant: It's just two pounds for storing. Customer: Here you are. Thanks again.

Conversation 5

Passenger: I'd like a ticket to Glasgow, please.

Ticket Controller: Single or return?

Passenger Single.

Ticket Controller: Smoking or non-smoking?

Passenger: Non-smoking, please.

Ticket Controller: That will be 25 pounds, please.

Passenger: What platform does it go from?

Ticket Controller: Number five, over there.

Passenger: And what time does it arrive?

Ticket Controller: Er, at half past nine. Passenger: Thank you.

TEST D - LISTENING

Presenter: Clean Up the World is the biggest communitybased environment project in the world. It started in 1989 in Sydney Harbour with the success of Clean Up Australia Day, the biggest community event in the country. It is the idea of one person, an Australian yachtsman, Ian Kicrnan, who was motivated to act after witnessing the effects of pollution and odier rubbish on oceans across the globe.

The international movement began in 1993 and involved 30 million people in 80 countries. The first countries to become involved included superpowers such as the United States, Japan and China and smaller nations such as the Comoros, Kiribati and Nauru.

What Clean Up the World does is empower communities to take simple, positive steps to protect their environment. It also has links with community groups, environment groups and businesses throughout the world. Its popularity

has brought about the involvement of 124 countries and approximately 37.5 million people as of January 2000.

Now let me mention a few details about the Clean Up the World Campaign 2001.

The ninth annual Clean Up the World campaign took place over the weekend of September 21 - 23,2001. It involved a wide range of activities including waste

collection, water treatment and education programmes. New countries like Ukraine, Mongolia and Taiwan participated

in their first Clean Up (he World campaign this year.

The Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), Mr Klaus Toepfer, highlighted the enormous contribution volunteers made to the prosperity of communities and the health and protection

of natural environments in the campaign this year: 'Clean Up the World raises awareness about the wider effects of modern-day lifestyles. This hopefully means that more people become motivated to fight not only litter and rubbish but the more invisible kinds of environmental pollution that poison our seas, air and land,' Mr Toepfer said.

Clean Up the World (or CUW, as it is known) has been joined in its ninth year by some of the world's most

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recognised global organisations dedicated to conservation, including the United Nations Environment Program and National Geographic Channels International.

TEST 9 - LISTENING

Ann: (ring, ring) Hello.

Donna: Hello, this is Donna. Is that you. Ann?

Ann: Yes, hello, Donna. 1 was just about to call you.

Donna: Really? I've been thinking about our plans for tomorrow. Do you still feel like taking a day tour around London?

Ann: Definitely. That's a fantastic idea. Any suggestions?

Donna: Actually, I've got plenty of ideas. Have you thought of anything you'd like to do or places you'd like to visit?

Ann: I guess I'd be happy to see some sort of exhibition and then go somewhere to have something to eat and

drink.

Donna: An exhibition? Have you heard of the Guinness World of Records?

Ann: Well...

Donna: It's actually the famous Guinness Book of Records brought to life. They've got everything there: models, videos and life-size exhibits. I think it would be a great start to the day and I bet you'll really enjoy it.

Ann: Sounds fine to me.

Donna: We could also go to see the Wallace Collection. You know, French art and sculpture of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. How_aboul that?

Ann: I'd rather go to die Guinness thing.

Donna: OK. How about popping into St Martin in the Fields later on? It's not very far. It's at the Charing Cross tube station.

Ann: Isn't it that famous church next to the National Gallery?

Donna: That's right. If we are lucky, we may hear some good music there.

Ann: All right. But I assume by that time we'd be ready for a decent meal.

Donna: I agree. I thought of a great place to go, but we'd have to travel to Docklands. I know of a great place there. There's a restaurant there called Baradero. It's in a great location beside Milhvall Dock, with views over the water and a quayside terrace. The staff are a Spanish-Latin American mix and they serve tapas and have a serious Spanish wine list.

Ann: That's sounds exciting. What time shall we meet then?

Donna: How about 10 o'clock at my place?

Ann: Great. I can't wait to see you.

Donna: Don't be late! Bye, Ann. Ann: Bye. See you tomorrow.

TEST E - LISTENING

On September 11,2001, Arab terrorists hijacked four planes en route from several American airports. Two of ihesc planes flew directly into the 110-storey World Trade

Center in New York City: another into the Pentagon in Washington IX', and ;\ lourlh plane crushed in ;i field in a small town in Pennsylvania. No passengers or crews of the airplanes survived, and thousands were killed from the massive destruction.

What follows are several first-hand accounts of people who witnessed these attacks in New York and Washington DC.

Account 1 Yvonne

Four months ago I moved to New York City from Bayswater in London. After hearing sirens and explosions this morning, I walked into my living room to find that both twin lowers that dominate the view from my window were on fire. I immediately attempted to contact my boyfriend, who works close to the towers. My flat is on the 22nd floor of a building on Union Square which faces south so my view was unimpeded. I initially thought it was just a fire and that the towers would be heavily damaged. I switched

on the news to find to my horror that it was a terrorist attack. When the first tower collapsed, I began to shake and

cry as it was so terrifying and unexpected.

Account 2 Matt

I'm British and live and work in Manhattan and the sense of shock and disbelief was incredible. The most ama/ing thing was that there was very little panic in the streets away from the immediate area. People were calmly trying to get home to their loved ones and were being patient and cooperative despite the difficulties of moving around.

Account 3 Paul

I live in Virginia but work in Washington DC. I was listening (o the radio ahoul what was thought to be a tragic accident in New York when the second plane hit the second tower. I was in shock. It was live on the radio about fifteen minutes later as I approached the Wilson Bridge. All of a sudden, I saw a passenger plane that seemed to be struggling to slay in the air and I pressed my brakes thinking it was going to crash into the highway. Then there was a ball of fire. I couldn't help it: I actually screamed and then began to cry as me reality of what had happened sank in.

Account 4 Trevor

I was at my desk wheu I looked up and saw the air filled wiili paper, then the smoke from the World Trade Centre, then the flames. My colleagues and I looked on helplessly from our building, wondering how the people could escape. We were on the 39th floor of a building about half a mile away. At that stage no one knew whether it was an accident or not although there was talk about ihc World Trade Centre being hit by an aircraft As we were powerless to help, I returned to my desk after about fifteen minutes. The moment I sat down a large aircraft flew past the window, turned sharply and crashed into the second tower. I knew then that it was no accident and the financial district seemed under attack.

Account 5 Klt/abcth

I have spent most of the day unable to think clearly. My father works a block from the While House, right on the National Mall. He was there today and was evacuated, and then rushed away because of a bomb threat. My sister lives in Washington DC and her school was shut down. My mother works on a nearby Navy Base, where they quickly went to the highest level of security. She is still stuck there, unable to get home. It is very hard to see the pictures on TV, and know that your family is out there and they are all so

helpless. Everything is quiet now, and the streets are empty. We are all just sitting at home.


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ANSWER KEY

USE OF ENGLISH

Testl

A:(l point each) 1 began; 2 had produced; 3 decided; 4 admires; 5 write; 6 became; 7 has received;

8 is recording

B:(l point each) 1 reliable/reliant; 2 decisive; 3 mysterious; 4 logical; 5 moody; 6 sympathetic; 7 tolerant:

8 likeable/likable

C: (1 point each) 1 look; 2 at; 3 take;

4 get; 5 in; 6 put; 7 by

D:(l point each) 1 Law-abiding;

2 conservative; 3 childish; 4 selfish;

5 suspicious; 6 competitive;

7 sensitive

Test 2

A: (0.5 point each) I had asked; 2 had finished; 3 had been cutting; 4 had been raining; 5 had explained; 6 had been studying

B: (1 point each) I was reading; 2 rose;

3 had fallen; 4 drove; 5 killed; 6 injured; 7 accepted; 8 had beeu sleepwalking

C: (2 points each) 1 She is pulling your leg.; 2 You are walking on thin ice.; 3 I'll have to eat humble pie.

D: (1 point each) 1 expressed; 2 burst;

3 out; 4 turned; 5 cling; 6 (ell;

7 drown; 8 grass; 9 tremble

E: (0,5-point each) 1 i; 2 c; 3 a; 4 h; 5 g;

- oi>; 7 e; 8 d

Test A

A: (I point each) 1 walked; 2 was removing; 3 had heard; 4 made; 5 docs; 6 did; 7 appeared; 8 became;

9 had given 10 has received; 11 tells;

12 have learned/leamt

B: (1 point each) 1 bored; 2 thin; 3 had;

4 heavily/hard; 5 took; 6 saw;

7 impatiently; 8 about; 9 turned;

10 humble

C: (0.5 point each) I sympathetic;

2 chatty; 3 sensible; 4 developing;

5 reckless; 6 innovative; 7 wealthy;

8 outgoing

D:(l point each) 1 get into; 2 crack ... up; 3 go off; 4 ring up; 5 make up; 6 get by; 7 put up; 8 take off: 9 get on

E: (0.5 point each) 1 a; 2 c; 3 b; 4 f; 5 j;

6 g; 7 i; 8 k; 9 c; 10 d

Test 3

A: (1 point each) 1 such; 2 so that; 3 so;

4 so; 5 like

B: (1 point each) 1 I read a travel brochure that/which said good health was essential for this kind of trip.; 2 Lawyers, who have to know the legal system very well, spend a lot of time learning ...; 3 Kate, whose father doesn't have a job at the

moment, raised (he issue of unemployment.; 4 I noticed a woman who was scared stiff.; 5 My little sister often picks her teeth afler a meal, which 1 find disgusting.; 6 Mark doesn't like that woman who tried to persuade him to buy a useless gadget.; 7 The hotel, where our parents used to stay while in Paris, was posh but cosy.

C: (0.5 point each) make a mess, a phone call, a point, a mistake; have a dream, a look, an influence, an effect; get to the top, lost, a promotion, in touch

D:(l point each) I takes; 2 go; 3 on;

4 go; 5 across; 6* for

E: (1 point each) I dyed; 2 unfashionable'old-fashioned;

3 pierced; 4 varnished/polished;

5 tattooed; 6 latest

Test 4

A:(l point each) 1 had been taken/were taken; 2 have been kept; 3 be banned: 4 was made; 5 were being interviewed; 6 have been killed; 7 are being restored; 8 has been noticed;

9 is known; 10 to be given

B: (1 point each) I He's got a bee in his bonnet about it; 2 he is the black sheep of the family; 3 I'd love to be a fly on the wall during their fight;

4 he let the eat out of the bag; 5 He is/feels like a fish out of water when he wears formal clothes.

C: (0.5 point each) 1 catchy; 2 graceful;

3 soothing; 4 stunning/magnificent;

5 soppy; 6 magnificent/stunning

D: (1 point each) I still; 2 bookworm;

3 thing/work; 4 race; 5 yawning;

6 down; 7 slare

Test B

A:(l point each) 1 had been based;

2 moved; 3 created; 4 managed; 5 have been avoided; 6 are not allowed; 7 are kept; 8 recycles; 9 is involved; 10 has succeeded: 11 has been made; 12 be given; 13 share

B: (1 point each) 1 Roosevelt, who became famous for his military achievements, was ...; 2 He tells such funny jokes.; 3 Our biology teacher had a great influence ...; 4 Many pupils use their mobile phones at school, which is considered ...; 5 correct; 61 read an article that discussed .,..; 7 He was so unpr