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Літературний захід присвячений Роберту Бернсу “My Heart in the Highlands”

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Літературний захід присвячений Роберту Бернсу “My Heart in the Highlands” розроблений з метою ознайомити учнів з біографією і творчістю Р.Бернса, навчити учнів формувати свою думку щодо теми уроку, розвивати різні види мовної діяльності, розширювати соціокультурну і комунікативну компетенції на підставі країнознавчого матеріалу.


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Літературний захід присвячений Роберту Бернсу

“My Heart in the Highlands”

 

Завдання:

  1. Познайомити учнів з біографією і творчістю Р.Бернса.
  2. Вчити учнів формувати свою думку щодо теми уроку.
  3. Розвивати різні види мовної діяльності.
  4. Розширювати соціокультурну і комунікативну компетенції на підставі країнознавчого матеріалу.
  5. Виховувати бажання вивчати культуру англомовних країн.

 

Обладнання: карта, додаткова література, опорні схеми, портрети, звукозаписи, комп’ютерні презентації.

Тихо звучить шотландська музика. Іде слайд-шоу з видами Шотландії. (a movie) Учень читає поезію.

 


My Heart's In The Highlands

Farewell to the Highlands, farewell to the North,

The birth-place of Valour, the country of Worth;

Wherever I wander, wherever I rove,

The hills of the Highlands forever I love.

 

My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here;

My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer;

A-chasing the wild-deer, and following the roe,

My heart's in the Highlands wherever I go.

 

Farewell to the mountains high covered with snow;

Farewell to the straths and green valleys below;

Farewell to the forests and wild-hanging woods;

Farewell to the torrents and loud-pouring floods.

 

 

Моє серце в верховині

Моє серце в верховині і душа моя,

Моя дума в верховині соколом буя,

Моя мрія в гори лине наздогін вітрам,

Моє серце в верховині, де б не був я сам.

Будь здорова, верховино, любий рідний край,

Честі й слави батьківщино, вольності розмай!

Хоч іду я на чужину, повернуся знов,

Моє серце в верховині і моя любов.

 

Прощавайте, сині гори, білії сніги,

Прощавайте, темні звори й світлії луги!

Прощавайте, пущі дикі й тіняві гаї,

Прощавайте, буйні ріки й бистрі ручаї!

Моє серце в верховині і душа моя,

Моя дума в верховині соколом буя,

Моя мрія в гори лине наздогін вітрам,

Моє серце в верховині, де б не був я сам.


Host I: It's winter now.

The autumn is over

The trees are all bare

There is mist in the garden

And frost in the air

On this beautiful autumn day we all gathered here to speak about a wonderful country of mountains and lakes – Scotland and about one of its greatest sons – Robert Burns.

 

Host II: We will have a literary party dedicated to this famous poet, who loved his motherland and his people more than everything in the world. So let’s make a trip to Scotland.

 

Student 1. Scotland (Gaelic: Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain, it shares a border with England to the south and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest. In addition to the mainland, Scotland consists of over 790 islands including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

 

Student 2. The national flag of Scotland, known as the Saltire or St. Andrew's Cross, dates (at least in legend) from the 9th century, and is thus the oldest national flag still in use. Since 1606 the Saltire has also formed part of the design of the Union Flag. There are numerous other symbols and symbolic artefacts, both official and unofficial, including the thistle, the nation's floral emblem, the 6 April 1320 statement of political independence the Declaration of Arbroath, the textile pattern tartan that often signifies a particular Scottish clan, and the Lion Rampant flag.

 

Student 3.Flower of Scotland is popularly held to be the National Anthem of Scotland, and is played at events such as football or rugby matches involving the Scotland national team. St Andrew's Day, 30 November, is the national day, although Burns' Night tends to be more widely observed.

 

Student 4.Common throughout Scotland, the prickly purple thistle has been Scotland's national emblem for centuries. There are several different legends that tell how the thistle became Scotland's symbol.

In the summer of 1263 King Haakon of Norway, intent on conquering the Scots, set off with a sizeable fleet of long ships for the Scottish coast. Legend has it that at some point during the invasion the Norsemen tried to surprise the sleeping Scottish Clansmen. In order to move more stealthily under the cover of darkness the Norsemen removed their footwear. But as they crept barefoot they came across an area of ground covered in thistles and one of Haakon's men unfortunately stood on one and shrieked out in pain. His shout warned the Scots who defeated the Norsemen at the Battle of Largs, thus saving Scotland from invasion. The important role that the thistle had played was recognized and so was chosen as Scotland's national emblem.

 

Student 5.The Great Highland Bagpipe is a type of bagpipe native to Scotland, which has achieved widespread recognition through its usage in the British military and in pipe bands throughout the world. The bagpipe is first attested in Scotland around 1400. The earliest references to Scottish bagpipes are in a military context, and it became established in the British military and achieved the widespread prominence it enjoys today.

 

Student 6.The kilt is a knee-length garment with pleats at the rear, originating in the traditional dress of men and boys in the Scottish Highlands of the 16th century. Since the 19th century it has been associated with the wider culture of Scotland in general. It is most often made of woolen cloth in a tartan pattern.

 

Student 7.Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, is a city of monuments, schools and old homes. It is one of the most beautiful cities on the British Isles. The streets of the Old Town are still very narrow. There is only one street here wide enough for the automobiles. The district has remained unchanged through centuries. The Old Town is separated from the New Town by a deep ravine through which Princess Street runs. The street is lined by great buildings on one side and by a broad-lying park on the other. The New Town has all usual characteristics of a well-planned modern city.

Edinburgh is not a great industrial city, although one of its nicknames, Old Smoky, suggests heavy industries. The city is important largely as intellectual center. It has one of the oldest universities in Europe, which was founded in 1582. It is one of the most famous universities in Great Britain.

 

Student 8.Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and third most populous in the United Kingdom. The city is situated on the River Clyde in the country's west central lowlands. Glasgow grew from the medieval Bishopric of Glasgow and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow. From the 18th century the city became one of Europe's main hubs of transatlantic trade with the Americas.

 

Student 9.The Scottish Highlands include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault, although the exact boundaries are not clearly defined, particularly to the east. The Great Glen divides the Grampian Mountains to the southeast from the Northwest Highlands. The area is generally sparsely populated, with many mountain ranges dominating the region, and includes the highest mountain in the British Isles, Ben Nevis.

 

Student 10.Among the Scots there were a lot of outstanding personalities, such as William Wallace, Walter Scott, Alexander Graham Bell, James Watt, Mary I of Scotland, Ewan McGregor, Sean Connery, Alexander Fleming. One of the most famous people of Scotland was Robert Burns. Every year on January, 25th Scotsmen all over the world gather together for a traditional celebration, called Burn’s Supper. Celebrating Burns’s birthday his admirers recite his best poems, sing songs. Traditional Scottish dishes are served during the supper. We invite you to try some of them-Oatmeal pancakes, Scottish eggs, and chocolate pudding. Burn’s Supper is usually finished with the famous “Auld Lang Syne”. We would like all of you to join us and sing it. (“Auld Lang Syne”).

Burn’s poetry is loved and enjoyed by all his countrymen. They love Burns for the generosity and kindness of his nature, for his patriotism and truthfulness. He loved Scotland with all his heart and many his poems were devoted to his native land.


Scots Wha Hae

Scots, wha hae wi Wallace bled,

Scots, wham Bruce has aften led,

Welcome to your gory bed

Or to victorie!

Now's the day, and now's the hour:

See the front o' battle lour,

See approach proud Edward's power---

Chains and slaverie!

Wha will be a traitor knave?

Wha can fill a coward's grave?

Wha sae base as be a slave?---

Let him turn, and flee!

Wha for Scotland's King and Law

Freedom's sword will strongly draw,

Freeman stand, or Freeman fa',

Let him follow me!

By Oppression's woes and pains,

By your sons in servile chains,

We will drain your dearest veins,

But they shall be free!

Lay the proud usurpers low!

Tyrants fall in every foe!

Liberty's in every blow!---

Let us do, or die!

 

Забудь, Шотландіє моя!

Забудь, Шотландіє моя,

Свою колишню славу!

Забудь своє гучне ім'я,

Звеличене по праву!

Припали Твіду береги

Англійцям ув обладу,—

Опанували вороги

Нас через чорну зраду.

Не міг відняти наших прав

Віками меч ворожий,

Та підлий зрадник нас продав

Катам за жменю грошей.

Англійську сталь не раз було

Щербили ми в двобої,

Англійське злото довело

Нас до біди тяжкої.

Розпука душу рве мою —

Ми в рабстві жити мусим!

О, чом я не поліг в бою

З Уоллесом чи Брюсом!

Та поки серця пал не згас,

Волатиму щосили:

За золото англійське нас

Запроданці згубили!

 


Host I: Now let’s speak about life and works of Robert Burns.

 

Student 1. He was born in 1759 in a small village, which is called Alleyway. You can see this clay cottage where R. Burns was born and spent 7 years of his life. His father, William Burns, was a small farmer, Robert learned from his father to love and understand people. From his mother he learned something important. As she worked she often sang old countryside songs. In the evening she told the children popular folk stories.

 

Host II: Robert Burns wrote about his father such lines.

My father was a farmer upon the Carrick border,

And carefully he bred me in decency and order,

He bade me act a manly part, though I had never a farthing,

For without an honest, manly heart no man was worth regarding.

       Now, let’s watch a short scene from the childhood of Robert Burns.

 

(The scene in the house of the Burns’. One boy is sitting with books. The mother is knitting. The father is explaining mathematics to the other boy.)

Father. So it makes 325, see? I wonder how quick you are at Maths, Robert. You’ve got a bright head, son. I think some day I may be proud of you.

Robert. I can easily understand the problems when you explain them to me.

Mother. Your father has got a smart head himself. I remember having listened to his stories for hours. He knew hundreds of them.

Gill. Will we both go to school, dad? I want to study very much.

Father. I will do my best, son, I promise. I wish my sons to be educated people, that’s my dream.

Mother. They are empty dreams, my dear. We can hardly make both end meet. We are still in debt for the farm. Where will you get the money to pay the teacher?

Father. It’s my dream to give my sons the best education I can afford. I will work day and night to achieve this goal.

Robert. We will help you, father.

Father. No, you will have to go to school.

Mother. You are so small, Rob. You are just a child. How will you help dad in the field? Ploughing here in the Highlands is tough for a man; it’s twice as tough for a boy. The land is so poor that however hard you may work you can hardly grow anything.

Robert. Mom, stop worrying. Besides, going to school in turns will save some money, because father will have to pay only for one pupil.

Father. Agness, don’t worry. I won’t allow the boys to work too much. And Rob’s idea to go to school in turns is good.

Robert. Listen, Dad, I wrote a poem.


Is there for honest poverty

That bends his and all that?

The coward slave, we pass him by –

We dare be poor for all that.

For all that and all that

Our toils’ obscure and all that

The rank is but the guinea’s stamp

The man’s the god for all that.


Father: Remember, Rob will one day become famous.

 

Host I: Burns began to write poems when he was fifteen years old. In his poems he described with love and understanding things and people. But to know more about his life and work in his young age we will listen to the interview with Robert burns himself.

 

Journalist. So, Robert, what education did you actually get?

Robert. Much of my education was taught by my father; including reading, writing, arithmetic, geography, history and Christian belief.

Journalist.What was your first job?

Robert. In 1781, I left to Irvine to become a flax-dresser. But due to New Year's partying by the workmen, the shop was burned to the ground.

Journalist. I know that when you were 14, your father died. How did you live after that?

Robert. Me and my brother Gilbert struggled to keep our father's farm. Moving to Mossigel, we held an equally tough battle for four years trying to get by. I was thinking about moving to Jamaica to become a bookkeeper on a plantation. However, I was quickly persuaded otherwise by a letter from Thomas Blacklock and his brother's suggestion in June 1786 to publish my poems in the volume

Journalist. So the first volume of your poems appeared in 1786, didn’t it? What did it include?

Robert. Poems were chiefly in the Scottish dialect. The volume included many of my best works including The Twa Dogs, The Address to the Deil, Hallowe'en, The Cottar's Saturday Night, To a Mouse, and The Daisy.

Journalist. Did the book gain a success?

Robert. The volume was a great success. I was even induced to visit Edinburgh to superintend the next edition. While there, I received an equally great welcome by Dugald Stewart, Robertson and Blair. I also made life-long friendships while at Edinburgh, including Lord Glencairn and Mrs. Dunlop.

Journalist. What happened next in your life?

Robert. The new edition of my book brought in £400. And on my return to Ayrshire, I married Jean Armour, took a farm of Ellisland near Dumfriesl. But literature took much of my time, my farm was unsuccessful and in 1791 I gave up.

Journalist. How did you get money after that?

Robert. Around the same time, I was offered a job on the London Star newspaper and a job as the Chair of Agriculture in the University of Edinburgh, but refused both. I went on writing poems and soon came to the forefront of lyric poets.

Journalist. Thank you , mister Burns, it was very interesting to know more about your life and work.

 

 

 

 

Host II: Robert Burns also wrote a lot of love songs, many of which are famous all over the world. His first love song was dedicated to Nell, a country girl. Nell was thirteen at that time and Robert was a year old. He devoted her a poem “Once I Loved a Bonnie Lass”

 


Once I lov'd a bonie lass,

Ay, and I love her still;

And whilst that virtue warms my breast,

I'll love my handsome Nell.

 

As bonie lasses I hae seen,

And mony full as braw;

But, for a modest gracefu' mein,

The like I never saw.

 

A bonie lass, I will confess,

Is pleasant to the e'e;

But, without some better qualities,

She's no a lass for me.


 

 

Host I: Later Robert had a love affair with Jean Armour, whom he married later. He devoted her a few of his love songs. The most famous of them is “Red, Red Rose”

 


O my Luve's like a red , red rose,

That's newly sprung in June:

O my Luve's like the melodie,

That's sweetly play'd in tune.

 

As fair art thou, my bonie lass,

So deep in luve am I;

And I will luve thee still, my dear,

Till a' the seas gang dry .

 

Till a' the seas gang dry , my dear,

And the rocks melt wi' the sun;

And I will luve thee still, my dear,

While the sands o' life shall run.

 

And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve !

And fare-thee-weel, a while!

And I will come again, my Luve ,

Tho' 'twere ten thousand mile!

 


Host II: Many of his poems were never printed during his lifetime, the most remarkable of these being "The Jolly Beggars," a piece in which, by the intensity of his imaginative sympathy and the brilliance of his technique, he renders a picture of the lowest dregs of society in such a way as to raise it into the realm of great poetry.

 

              Host I:Millions of people all over the world highly esteem and love Burns’s poems. Burns’s poems were translated into Russian by many poets. Among them were M.Lermontov, K Balmont , and others.The best translations of Burns’ poems into Russian were done by Samuel Marshak. He translated 215 poems.

 

Host II: Burns’s poems are very melodious; a lot of them are set to music and often used in the films. The most popular among them are “Love and Poverty” from the movie “Hello, I am your aunt!” sung by A. Kaliahin, and “There is no peace in my soul…” from the movie “The office romance”

 

 

Host I:

              Though Burn’s poems were very popular, he always remained poor. He worked hard on the farm, but in 1791 went bankrupt and sold his farm. Burns became a customs officer in Dumfries. During the last five years of his life, Burns wrote some of his best poems and songs. By this time he was a very sick man. After a short illness he died on the 21st July 1796.

 

           Host II: We hope that during our party you got much pleasure and knew a lot of interesting things about Robert Burns.

          Host I: Thank you very much for your attention. Good-bye (together).

 

Quiz-show

 

 

 

Host I: It's winter now.

The autumn is over

The trees are all bare

There is mist in the garden

And frost in the air

On this beautiful autumn day we all gathered here to speak about a wonderful country of mountains and lakes – Scotland and about one of its greatest sons – Robert Burns.

 

Host II: We will have a literary party dedicated to this famous poet, who loved his motherland and his people more than everything in the world. So let’s make a trip to Scotland.

 

Host I: Now let’s speak about life and works of Robert Burns.

 

Host II: Robert Burns wrote about his father such lines.

My father was a farmer upon the Carrick border,

And carefully he bred me in decency and order,

He bade me act a manly part, though I had never a farthing,

For without an honest, manly heart no man was worth regarding.

       Now, let’s watch a short scene from the childhood of Robert Burns.

 

Host I: Burns began to write poems when he was fifteen years old. In his poems he described with love and understanding things and people. But to know more about his life and work in his young age we will listen to the interview with Robert burns himself.

 

Host II: Robert Burns also wrote a lot of love songs, many of which are famous all over the world. His first love song was dedicated to Nell, a country girl. Nell was thirteen at that time and Robert was a year old. He devoted her a poem “Once I Loved a Bonnie Lass”

 

Host I: Later Robert had a love affair with Jean Armour, whom he married later. He devoted her a few of his love songs. The most famous of them is “Red, Red Rose”

 

Host II: Many of his poems were never printed during his lifetime, the most remarkable of these being "The Jolly Beggars," a piece in which, by the intensity of his imaginative sympathy and the brilliance of his technique, he renders a picture of the lowest dregs of society in such a way as to raise it into the realm of great poetry.

 

              Host I:Millions of people all over the world highly esteem and love Burns’s poems. Burns’s poems were translated into Russian by many poets. Among them were M.Lermontov, K Balmont , and others.The best translations of Burns’ poems into Russian were done by Samuel Marshak. He translated 215 poems.

 

Host II: Burns’s poems are very melodious; a lot of them are set to music and often used in the films. The most popular among them are “Love and Poverty” from the movie “Hello, I am your aunt!” sung by A. Kaliahin, and “There is no peace in my soul…” from the movie “The office romance”

 

Host I:

              Though Burn’s poems were very popular, he always remained poor. He worked hard on the farm, but in 1791 went bankrupt and sold his farm. Burns became a customs officer in Dumfries. During the last five years of his life, Burns wrote some of his best poems and songs. By this time he was a very sick man. After a short illness he died on the 21st July 1796.

 

           Host II: We hope that during our party you got much pleasure and knew a lot of interesting things about Robert Burns.

          Host I: Thank you very much for your attention. Good-bye (together).

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