From the History of Great Britain

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It is a lesson plan about the history of the United State of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
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Lesson plan

 

Number of learners (in the group):

Level:

Class:

Topic of the lesson: From the History of  Great Britain

Topic of the lesson in Ukrainian:  З історії Великобританії

Glossary of the terms (key words of the lesson):

Aims:

  • teaching:
  • educational:
  • developing:

Aids:

Type of the lesson: combined lesson

 

The procedure of the lesson

 

Tentative/planned timing

Contents/activities

1

Organizing. Greeting.

5

Warmer up activity

5

Homework checking/Review material of the previous lesson

1. What are the main economical sectors in Britain?

2. What is the main sector in British Industry?

3. What are the largest manufacturing concerns in Britain?

4. Which cities/areas are the centres of steel production?

1

Introducing the topic of the lesson – Today we are going to speak about the history of Great Britain.

20

Introducing the new material

Celts and Romans. The first inhabitants of Britain were the Celts. They crossed the English Channel many centuries before the Christian era. The Celts or Britons practised agriculture and dug up minerals such as tin, lead and gold. Their religion was Druidism and their priests, the Druids, were famous for their magic arts. Roman legions led by Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 BC. The Romans eventually conqyered much of the island and ruled it for almost 400 years. They built cities, country estates, bridges, and roads. The Romans could not control the entire island. In the northern part of Britain, in the area known today as Scotland, lived peoples called the Picts and the Scots. They resisted Roman rule and attacked Roman settlements in the south. To keep them out, Roman soldiers built great walls with forts and towers. The greatest monument they left is Hadrian’s Wall, between England and Scotland. The Romans also had difficulties in the area that they did rule. They could not win over the Celts. Most Celts lived in their own villages and were not interested in or influenced by the Roman culture. Roman rule in Britain began to crumble during the fourth century AD. This was because Roman soldiers were called home to defend the empire’s borders against the invasions by the Germans and the Huns.

The Anglo-Saxons. After the last legions left in 410 AD the island was gradually invaved by groups from northern Germany and Denmark called Angles, Saxons, and Jutes. They were strong warriors and by the seventh century AD controlled most of the island. The Angles, Saxons, and Jutes united to become the Anglo-Saxons. They built settlements, farmed the land, and set up several small kingdoms. The southern part of Britain soon became known as Angleland, or England. The people became known as the English. The Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Britain followed the Germanic religions. Pope Gregory I decided to convert the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity. In 597 AD he sent a mission of 411 monks to England under the leadership of the monk Augustine. By 700 AD, all England was Christian. The Pope was the head of the church. Many monasteries were built in England and they became centres of religion and culture. One of the monks, Bede, was a great scholar. He wrote the first history of the English people. Even though they accepted Christianity, the Anglo-Saxons kept much of their old culture. They told and retold old legends about brave warriors fighting monsters and dragons. One such legend was about a warrior named Beowulf. In the eighth century AD, it was written down as an epic poem called Beowulf which became known as the most important work of Anglo-Saxon literature.

The Hundred Years’ War. In the early 1300s, the English still held a small part of southwest France. The kings of France, who were growing more powerful, wanted to drive the English out. In 1337, the English king, Edward III, declared himself king of France. This angered the French even more. In 1339, the French and English fought the first in a long series of battles known as the Hundred Years’ War.

The Hundred Years’ War began when the English defeated the French fleet and won control of the sea. The English then invaded France. They defeated the French at the Battle of Crecy in 1347 and again at the Battle of Agincourt in 1417. By 1453, the English held only the French seaport at Calais, and the war came to an end.

The Wars of the Roses. Peace did not come to England after the Hundred Years’ War. In 1455, two noble families, York and Lancaster, began a srtuggle for the throne which lasted many years. The York symbol was a white rose, and the Lancaster symbol was a red rose. For this reason the struggle between York and Lancaster was called the Wars of the Roses. All rivalry between the Roses ended by the marriage Henry VII, the Lancastrian with Princess Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV, the Yorkist in 1485.

5

Practising the new material

1. When did the romans come to Britain?

2. How did the Roman way of life influence the life of Celts?

3. Are there any things in Britain to remind the people of the Romans?

4. Who is Bede?

5. What do you know about Beowulf?

6. When was the Hundred Years’ War?

7. What was the symbol of the York in the Wars of the Roses?

8. What was the symbol of the Lancasters?

9. What was the end of the rivalry between the Roses?

1

Evaluating the learners activity and knowledge of the lesson

3

Summarizing the whole material of the lesson

4

Homework giving

 

End-of-lesson activity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX – FROM THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN

 

1. Warmer up activity

 

Battle Ships - A Vocabulary Game

Level: Easy to Medium

Preparation:
Divide the students in to groups of four or five. Then ask the student to make the name for their ships for example with the names of animals, cities, movie stars or let them find their own favourite names.

Ask them to choose the Captain and the Shooter. The captain's duty is to memorize his ship's name, so he can reply if somebody call his ship's name. The shooter's duty is to memorize the names of the ships of 'their enemies', so he can shoot them by calling their ship's name.

Activity:
Arrange all the captains in a circle, the ships' crews must line up behind their captains. The shooter is the last crew member in line.

The teacher must decide a lexical area of vocabulary, this vocabulary will be used to defend their ships from the attacks. Every students (except the shooters) must find their own words. The lexical area for example, "Four Legged Animals". Give the students 1-2 minutes to find as many possible words as they can and memorize them.

Start the game by calling a ship's name, for example the ship name is "THE CALIFORNIAN". The captain of THE CALIFORNIAN must reply with a word from the lexical area given, for example he says "TIGER" followed by his crews behind him one by one, "COW"; "SHEEP" until it  is the shooter turns and he calls out the name of another ship and the captain of the ship called must reply and his crews must do the same thing. No word can be repeated.

If the captain is late to reply (more than 2 seconds) or his crew can not say the words or a word repeated or the shooter shoots the wrong ship (his own ship or the ship that has already been sunk) the ship is sunk, and the crew members can join the crew of another ship.

The teacher can change the lexical area for the next round.

In the last round there will be two big groups battling to be the winner.

 

2. End-of-lesson activity

 

In small groups discuss the following questions.

 

Around the year 1500, about 5 million people used the English language – less than the population of England at the time. Today, it is estimated that at least 600 million people use English regularly in everyday life – at least ten times the present population of Britain. Why has the use of English expanded so much in the last 500 years?

 

Have you read any historical novels written by English writers? What were they? What were they about and what period of the British history did they describe?

 

Imagine you have a British pen-friend who have never visited Ukraine. Choose any fact of the Ukrainian history and write short letter to your pen-friend describing it.

 

3. Homework

A Medieval Town

Long ago many towns had walls around them. As you walked round a town you came every hundred yards or so to towers that stood out from the walls and rose high above them, so that no enemy could come up to the wall. On each side of the gates the towers were higher and stronger than usual. From a long way off it was possible to see the church towers risisng high above the red-tiled roofs of the houses.

On busy days the roads leading to the gates of the town were crowded. Farmers came to sell cheese, butter, eggs and other things to the citizens. The toll collector stood at the gates. The farmers had to pay duty on everything they brought in for sale.

Let’s look at the streets and shops. The shops were places where people made things as well as sold them. They had no glass windows. Across the front of each shop there ran the counter with different things exposed for sale on it. The shopkeepers stood behind them. All of them shouted without stopping: “What can I do for you?”

Some of the houses of the town were built of stone and wood, just like old houses in some of the present-day villages. Sometimes the ground floor wall was made of stone and had small windows. The door was broad, made of tough wood. The first storey overhung the ground floor, and had rather big windows, and the roof was covered with tiles.

The people wore strange clothes. The streets were very dirty because they were never swept up. But everybody seemed jollier than the Englishmen who walk the streets nowadays. Perhaps they made a living more easily than we do. Perhaps they troubled themselves less about the things we think important. They had more time to do things they liked than we have, because they did not spend all day at business. No wonder old England is called “Merry England”.

 

Answer the questions

 

1. Were medieval towns just like ours?

2. How did they differ?

3. Nowadays in Great Britain some people have surnames like “Baker”, “Butcher”, “Smith” and so on. What reason can you think of for names like these?

 

Find the words from the text in the grid ( ), write them out and make sentences with these words.

 

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Towers, wall, gate, duty, citizen, counter, church, sale

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